As most of you know – we love to build with pallet wood but that means you have to learn a quick and easy way to disassemble a pallet.  

Here is a great pallet to use – nice thick wood and untreated
If you spend a little time looking  – it is usually pretty easy to find a source to get them for free (See: 6 Simple Tips To Finding Free Pallets). In addition – if you find the right kind – the building potential is limitless.  I thought for today’s DIY post I would show how we go about taking a pallet from its current state to great usable wood in just a few minutes

Working with pallets – the first thing we realized early on is it is nearly impossible and too time consuming to worry yourselves with pulling out the nails.  It is too easy to damage the wood with the claw and hammer or pry bar.

Video On How To Disassemble Pallets:

You can get a corded or cordless sawzall – but they are the king of dismantling pallets.

Instead, we opt for our sawzall method – which can disassemble a pallet in less than two minutes into 10 or more pieces of great usable wood.  Besides – the left over embedded nail fragments actually add a ton of character to pieces when either stained or painted.

1st Tip – Invest in a reciprocating saw (sawzall).

They are the key to quickly destructing a pallet – and without damaging or splintering the wood.  Yes, it’s an expense – but the inexpensive ones will work just fine with pallets.

Throw out the little 5″ min blade and Invest in a 12″ Demo/Construction Blade. They last forever and can rip apart a pallet in a few minutes.

2nd Tip – Forget about the little 5″ blade that comes with your sawzall.

That will only frustrate you.  Buy a couple of 12″ construction blades (trust me – the few bucks are worth it – and they last forever).

3rd Tip – How to disassemble.

You can follow below with the pictorial below on how we do it – but in a nutshell – set it on its side and simply slice through the nails on each end. Then – head down the middle row doing the same thing and in no time you have a lot of great pallet wood for all of your crafts!  We have made everything from our custom mailbox, to a wine rack, raised bed stand and more – all for virtually free with pallets. (See: Our Project Pallets)

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How To Disassemble A Pallet

First Step – take your sawzall and cut down through one side of the smaller boards all the way to the bottom
Next cut down the opposite side – followed by the middle if there is one – the boards simply fall off
Once you have the front side finished – repeat for the back side – which are usually the largest of the boards
This is what you are left with – great boards to get building with!
This hutch was made from pallet and shipping crate boards

155 thoughts on “How to Disassemble Pallets With Ease

  • January 29, 2016 at 11:01 am
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    I have tried to sand down pallets for the projects i’m doing and those nail heads destroy sanding belts.Any ideas ?

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    • January 30, 2016 at 7:17 pm
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      Just pop them out from the back side with a punch and hammer. If you don’t have a punch then use a 6 or 8 penny nail.

      Reply
  • January 23, 2016 at 10:32 pm
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    Excellent info! I have a source for pallets but busted tbem up trying to pry them apart. Let the building begin!

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  • January 23, 2016 at 8:53 pm
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    Thank you. I want to make stands for raised gardens because of bad back preventing getting up and down. This info will speed up process of building those stands.

    Reply
  • December 11, 2015 at 11:00 am
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    Thank you very much. Only thing that sucks, Lmbo. I lost my new sawzaw in my newest move. Lol but harbour freight has a cheap model until you get going in business. Praying for the best outcome of my new business. And the safety of all who love to work with wood also. Amen

    Reply
  • November 30, 2015 at 3:17 pm
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    I found a way to hold the pallet up so it doesn’t fall over while cutting. Put a pallet on the ground and screw into place a thick piece of wood from another pallet. This piece will be as close to the middle as possible. The whole thing will look like an upside down ‘T’. Slip another pallet over the screwed in wood. This holds the pallet steady while you cut it.
    The problem I have had is cutting the center planks with my reciprocating saw. I have actually had to use a pry tool and a hammer to loosen the planks.

    Reply
  • October 20, 2015 at 5:38 am
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    The sawzal is the way to go; and Harbor freight tools has a good price on them. I would also like to addd , there are other good i deals out there . Its just the sawzal work the best for me. well thank you and keep on sawing.g

    Reply
  • September 23, 2015 at 4:28 pm
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    Thanks for the tip for removing the nails from pallets.

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  • September 6, 2015 at 9:14 am
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    Can’t wait to try it!!

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  • July 28, 2015 at 7:06 pm
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    Awesome trick! And I just HAPPEN to have a sawzall in my garage. Going to hardware store tomorrow to find the 12″ demolition blades. Thank you SO MUCH for relieving so much frustration for me and you’re right-the nail remnants add great character to any piece!

    Reply
    • July 30, 2015 at 5:00 am
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      Only good if u are taking apart one skid. Have u seen the price of the blades? It’s cheaper to buy the wood.

      Reply
      • July 30, 2015 at 8:38 am
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        Willy – I think i have used one blade to take apart over 150 of them – so the blades should last you a long time.

        Reply
      • July 30, 2015 at 10:58 am
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        I had a gadget made up to dismantle a Pallet in 5 minutes or less…it’s like a 2 Prong Fork with a 3′ Handle with the Prongs spaced apart to sit over the “Frame” and just exert the slightest of pressure and the Latts { cross pieces} pop up…OK you have to remove the Nails, but your rid of all Nails and you can use Electric Tools without worrying about damaging them…U Tube has the Gadget…check under…”Pallet Levers / Dismantlers”…just thought it was worth a mention…

        Reply
  • July 21, 2015 at 12:50 pm
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    I have used your method for years. It is the only way to go if you are not worried about nails in the 2x. I have both a corded and cordless DeWalt saws and only buy Premium Blades. Money well spent!

    Reply
  • July 10, 2015 at 1:58 pm
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    Thank you on your post to dismantle a pallet. My son and I spent hour after frustrating hour trying to dismantle with a hammer and pry bar (without much success).

    Reply
  • July 7, 2015 at 8:59 am
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    Nice, but there’s one problem: you end up with pieces of metal in your boards. Can be hazardous in a tablesaw or a planer. Its certainly not very good for your expensive machinery.

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  • June 23, 2015 at 11:04 pm
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    Thank you for this! I have spent hours trying to pull apart pallets!

    Reply
  • May 4, 2015 at 1:23 pm
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    I just love this web site . It is so very helpful and such wonderful idea ! Thank You, Patsy

    Reply
  • April 7, 2015 at 7:57 pm
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    I love harbor freight for my crafting tools. I don’t need top of the line to craft with. They have great sales and you can purchase a warranty for most things if you want to.

    Reply
  • March 19, 2015 at 8:27 pm
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    I’ve bought a reciprocating saw (UK) but how do you get your saw into the gap between the slats and the supports? Do you have to slice through part of the wood before you reach the nails?
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • March 19, 2015 at 9:33 pm
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      Hi Arlene – if the boards are nailed really tight and there are no gaps – you can either slice through a bit of the wood to get the nails – or use a mallet to pound just a bit to loosen the boards so it will fit. Hope that helps! Jim and Mary

      Reply
      • March 20, 2015 at 10:49 am
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        I’m sure you have seen the directions above and if you can’t find a 12 inch blade in your area check with HarborFreight.com , you can order it there.

        Reply
  • February 21, 2015 at 10:56 am
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    Julie, you can go to HarborFreight.com ,,join the site & get discounts every week. You can order online & get free delivery on a lot of things. I live near a H F store and buy most of my tools there. I paid $20. for my Saws all.

    Reply
  • February 14, 2015 at 2:05 am
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    I have pinned this post and referenced it numerous times in all the pallet projects we’ve done. I’ve featured this tutorial on my blog and wanted to share the love and make sure people can come to this post to learn how easy it is to disassemble the pallets – if they do it right and follow your steps!

    Thanks for rockin’ the inspiration!

    Reply
    • February 14, 2015 at 5:54 am
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      Jen – thank yo so much for all of the shares and mentions! It is amazing how many cool things can be made form pallets!!!

      Reply
  • February 5, 2015 at 1:47 am
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    Can you use a jigsaw to do this if they make a demolition blade to fit?

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  • February 5, 2015 at 1:46 am
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    Does this work with a jigsaw? Do they make a demolition blade for this type of saw?

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    • February 21, 2015 at 1:30 am
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      Julie,

      Invest in a cheap Sawzall from Harbor freight if there is one by you. A jigsaw will not work and will just drive you crazy if you try it. Also make sure you buy the long demolition blade for the best results

      Reply
  • January 30, 2015 at 2:09 pm
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    Thanks for this. I’ve been interested in building using pallets but always wondered about the nails. This makes it so much easier, and the nails look kind of cool as well.

    Reply
  • January 20, 2015 at 5:17 am
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    If you wanted to pull the nails out, how do you do that?

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    • January 21, 2015 at 9:53 am
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      I use nail pulling bars, bought at the nearest hardware store, (Lowes or Harbor Freight), I also use a punch & hammer if the nails break off.

      Reply
  • January 18, 2015 at 9:34 am
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    This is a great site! I am retiring in a couple of months and my wife and I will finally have the time for some serious gardening and all of The one issue I might have is by not pulling the nails, I can’t run the large blocks through my planner. I knew a guy in California who used pallet wood for all of his projects and they were beautiful!

    Thanks for a great site! We thank you and our ducks and chickens thank you!

    Reply
    • January 18, 2015 at 10:35 am
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      Sometimes it’s worth the time it takes & the trouble for me to pull the nails. If it’s something I’m doing for my wife I will pull the nails & sand the wood down I need to keep my biscuit maker happy, πŸ˜‰ . For others I ask if they want it finished or ruff cut.

      Reply
  • January 15, 2015 at 11:43 am
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    So helpful with the deconstruction of the boards!
    I’m planning on making a shoe bench and a corner storage piece for in my kitchen πŸ˜€ (triangle shaped to maximize space!)
    Thanks a bunch!

    Reply
  • January 12, 2015 at 4:01 am
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    I love the hutch at the end of this post. My hope is to make something similar for my dining room. After finding pallets and an old glass cabinet door

    Reply
  • January 3, 2015 at 11:48 am
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    This works great on perfect pallets. Hard to find perfect pallets on a regular basis. Still this is the best way..Thx

    Reply
  • August 24, 2014 at 10:06 pm
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    I like to use the 2x4s in my construction, and sometime need to rip them. What do you do with the cut-off nails?

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    • October 6, 2014 at 7:06 pm
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      Poke them through and pull them.

      Reply
      • October 7, 2014 at 9:44 am
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        is harder separate the boards and pull the nails without breaking up the boards, but at times I need boards without nails. I have a variety of pry bars, and nail pullers that help but don’t always work.

        Reply
  • July 14, 2014 at 10:32 am
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    Do you sand your boards before using them? If so, how?

    Reply
  • June 18, 2014 at 12:15 pm
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    Thanks for this tutorial! Although I have to admit that it wasn’t quite so easy for me to get it done as it seems to be for you… maybe I would need more practice. But either way I linked up this tutorial in my blog because it helped a lot!
    http://www.atreasureredefined.com
    Check out my tailgate/pallet bench that I just completed!

    Reply
    • August 14, 2014 at 11:30 am
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      Myself personally, I eventually chisel and sand my boards. Usually in stages as I build or at the end in the case of a table. I will remove grim and splinters with 80grit and finish with 150 on most parts or 220 on table tops. Key is to not try and be perfect I just like removing milling marks and anychance of splinters.

      Reply
  • June 6, 2014 at 8:49 pm
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    Are these pallets treated or are they just raw wood?

    Reply
  • June 6, 2014 at 8:44 am
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    I’ve done this years ago..You are exactly right…..Save money with good looking outcomes. Makes you feel good to accomplish something nice.

    Reply
  • June 6, 2014 at 1:15 am
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    What do you do with the pieces of nails that are left in the planks?

    Reply
  • June 5, 2014 at 1:56 pm
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    Great, easy to understand format. Thank you!

    Reply
  • April 5, 2014 at 12:14 am
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    Where do you get the pallets from?

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    • April 5, 2014 at 6:57 am
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      We just found us a new source to get pallets. We went and volunteered at our local food bank for the needy & the director said they have a bunch of pallets they usually throw away & we can have them.
      You can find them any where just look and ask.

      Reply
  • March 18, 2014 at 12:56 pm
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    What brand and model sawzall do you use? there are so many choices!

    Reply
  • March 14, 2014 at 4:31 pm
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    Thanks for the great tutorial. I only wish I would have found it sooner! We used pallet wood to build a great Dane dog house last year and used a claw hammer and a pry bar. Needless to say it took forever to get all the wood usable. We used this method last weekend and it was a breeze!

    Reply
  • February 21, 2014 at 1:33 am
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    Great guide! I tend to use a mallet to disassemble mine and the method is reasonably easy (there’s a video over on my blog if you’re interested) but it’s not ideal for every kind of pallet. I’ll certainly have to look into this method too.

    Reply
  • February 6, 2014 at 12:21 pm
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    Love all these used pallet ideas! Where do you usually get them from?

    Reply
  • January 30, 2014 at 5:44 pm
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    Do you have pics on how to remove the middle part of the boards? I can not get my sawzall blade in between the slat and the 2×4?? Please help!

    Reply
    • January 30, 2014 at 6:57 pm
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      If it won’t fit behind it – try taking a mallet or hammer – and just tapping the boards a little to get the nails exposed and you should be able to get them out.

      Reply
  • January 23, 2014 at 5:05 pm
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    Thank you!!! I was sitting outside after taking a break from helping my husband pry apart pallets via crowbar and hammer thinking my pallet wall dream would never happen because I was already exhausted. I began googling around and found this. My husband was kicking himself because we have a sawzall and a ten inch blade for it. Looks like this pallet wall will be assembled in no time thanks to you!

    Reply
    • January 23, 2014 at 5:11 pm
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      So glad you found our site and the post! You will have to let us know how it works for you! Good Luck! Jim and Mary

      Reply
  • December 31, 2013 at 1:07 pm
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    Don’t you end up with sharp edges from the nails?

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  • December 16, 2013 at 11:06 pm
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    how do you tell by looking at the pallet if it is treated or not?
    Also- you should add an affiliate link to the sawzall on Amazon… πŸ™‚

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    • December 17, 2013 at 12:27 pm
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      HT stands for Heat Treated that is the non- toxic ones and THAT should be at the very TOP of the article before someone saws into treated wood and get sick breathing in the sawdust!!!

      Reply
  • November 21, 2013 at 9:55 pm
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    Check Craigslist for pallets. They average $1.00 each in the midwest.

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  • November 21, 2013 at 1:50 pm
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    that’s exactly how i do it. if you then want to remove nails from the flat boards, using a nail punch from backside is pretty easy.

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    • November 22, 2013 at 8:22 am
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      My wife & I saw men building metal storage buildings, so we stopped and asked about the pallets, they told us we could have them. We spent some hot summer days taking them apart. WE got 14 4X4s 9’6″ ,30 2X4s 9’6”, no telling how many 1X4s & 1X3s. We are still building things with this wood. Oh btw, it was mostly oak.

      Reply
  • November 21, 2013 at 12:29 pm
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    Do you care whether the pallets are treated or untreated wood during your construction projects?

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  • November 21, 2013 at 11:56 am
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    FYI, most pallets are made of common white wood (ie. pine or fir) but if you look around especially for older pallets you can find them made of hardwoods such as oak or ash. Which I find more desirable for woodworking projects.

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    • November 21, 2013 at 3:41 pm
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      On the freighters they use a very hard wood to block materials on the deck/etc. The wood is not well known but rare. Very dark and very hard, the grains are very tight and it has a natural oil for lubrication. It sounds like this:
      “Lig num vi te”. Have you heard of it?

      Reply
      • November 21, 2013 at 7:05 pm
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        Lignum vitae , also known as iron wood, is very well known by woodworkers. and at around $50 per board-foot,very expensive.(12x12x1 inch) it’s the densest wood in the world. sinks like a rock. the navy uses it for main shaft bearings etc in nuclear submarines. it’s serious stuff.

        Reply
    • November 21, 2013 at 3:45 pm
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      Behind Hardware stores, train terminals,auto stores, food supple warehouses, etc

      Reply
  • November 20, 2013 at 7:02 pm
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    Congratulations! Grit Magazine recommending your site and sharing your post!

    Reply
  • November 20, 2013 at 6:29 pm
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    My husband and I were watching something on TV and they showed flooring that was made out of pallets……it was stained almost a natural color and it was beautiful! My husband said it was because pallets are made from oak usually. My brain is on overdrive for a new project! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  • November 12, 2013 at 12:47 pm
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    I was using a demolition blade with my Milwaukee, and it broke a lot of the teeth off. I think I am going to try thr “Torch” hacksaw blade next time

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  • November 11, 2013 at 9:44 pm
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    So, you cut right through the nails??

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    • November 12, 2013 at 5:50 am
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      Yep – right through the nails – its a quick and easy way! – Jim

      Reply
  • November 7, 2013 at 2:08 pm
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    isthe saw the same as a recipricating saw.?

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  • November 5, 2013 at 10:28 pm
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    Do you have a specific sawzall you recommend? I want to get a good one, but don’t know what I am looking for in terms of amps or volts.

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    • November 6, 2013 at 8:15 am
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      I have a porter cable corded and a cordless model I use sometimes too when I am away from a power source. They have both been great for me. The corded is an 8.5 amp and works great. The cordless is a lithium 18 volt model, and works well too, The key is the blade – get a good construction blade and it will cut your work in half. Jim

      Reply
  • October 15, 2013 at 8:56 am
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    Thank You so much! I made a Pallet Bar and I am wanting to do some more projects. This tip will certainly save me time. Please check out my blog…simplebutfabulous.blogspot.com

    Reply
  • October 7, 2013 at 2:23 pm
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    What is “the right kind” of pallet to find and how do you go about finding free ones? Thanks for any advice. πŸ™‚ Love your blog!!

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  • October 5, 2013 at 8:26 pm
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    If you dismantle pallets get the 12″ blade. It makes a huge difference. I have been trying various methods of dismantling pallets and this is the best.

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  • October 3, 2013 at 11:21 am
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    Awesome. I like to build containers for gardening, and the wood from these is untreated and not painted with lead based paint like some reclaimed fence wood. Fantastic. Thank you.

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  • September 28, 2013 at 12:01 pm
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    Where can you find free pallets?

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  • September 19, 2013 at 9:03 pm
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    I’m so glad I found this! So I understand how this works, however, do you leave the nails in the boards after you cut them off? Thanks!

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  • September 16, 2013 at 4:00 pm
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    I’m so glad I found this! So I understand how this works, however, do you leave the nails in the boards after you cut them off? Thanks!

    Reply
  • September 12, 2013 at 11:19 am
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    Much more effective way to dismantle them!!
    I am brand new to pallet building and have been trying to get a good technique…
    I was using the pry board method and in some instances, just cut the ends off to the point where they connect with the nails. It wasted quite a bit of length and I would be unable to reuse the supprt boards.
    Thanks for this simple solution!

    Reply
  • August 27, 2013 at 5:11 pm
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    I have had quite a few pallets in my shed but couldn’t get them broke down. I am so happy to see this hint. I don’t know why I didn’t even think of using a sawzall. At my age though I think I will just borrow my son’s and buy the blades to fit. LOL! Thanks again!

    Reply
    • August 27, 2013 at 9:27 pm
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      That’s great Bonnie – and you are welcome!!! You will have to let us know how it works for you.

      Reply
  • August 24, 2013 at 8:48 pm
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    I am working on a few projects with pallets. I have prying them apart the old fashioned way and was looking for a solution and saw your post. I went out and purchased a 18volt cordless sawzall with heavy duty blades. I used it today and it seams as though the unit bogs down while trying to cut thru the nails. I am not sure if the unit is not strong enough, or perhaps the battery is only charged some of the way and that is making it slow down. Any feedback would be nice. I expected this saw to breeze thru these nails and make this job easier. Any thoughts?

    Thanks

    Reply
    • August 25, 2013 at 8:46 am
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      I am not sure of the exact brand or saw that you purchased – but you are right – it should cut through easily. The blades we use are 12″ construction blades designed to cut through metal and wood quickly. I also use an electric sawzall for most of cutting, although I have an 18volt lithium sawzall from Porter Cable that I use also and works quickly.

      Reply
  • July 21, 2013 at 11:12 pm
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    I promised my son a chicken coop recently. You have no idea how happy I am to have found this tip. I was not looking forward to prying apart pallets. Thank you so much!

    Reply
    • July 22, 2013 at 8:40 am
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      That is awesome and good luck with building the coop! Feel free to email us if you have any questions along the way! Jim

      Reply
  • July 17, 2013 at 9:35 pm
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    Hi-Thank you for your tip on how you Disassemble Pallets. I did it today, loved it, a time saver. I have two large pallet’s and I’m making me one big privacy fence. Thank you for the tip. Love your site. CK

    Reply
  • June 29, 2013 at 3:22 am
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    Thank you very much for this tip. I mush see if you get this tool in south Africa. I make all my work out of pallet wood and really battle to keep the wood in one piece.
    regards

    Ryan McCann

    Reply
  • June 28, 2013 at 7:49 am
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    Hi love the pallet projects and your website for the farm. I have made a few simple projects outdoors using old pallets such as a garbage can “hider”, which I white washed, plant beds for new garden plants, and raised beds for some flowers near the house. All untreated of course but no need to worry about nail parts stickeing out as they are rustic and I just pounded in any nail bits. My question is what do you do with the sharp parts of the nails after cutting. I would love to make a dining table using the pallets, cleaned then stained and sealed. My concern is getting cuts or scratches from the ail bits left in. As this will be indoors and rustic but by no means the same as a garden bed I need to make sure the people and animals indoors do not get hurt.

    Reply
  • June 27, 2013 at 9:20 pm
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    With pallet wood, is there ever any concern about the wood itself? If it’s been pressure treated? Should that be a consideration before doing projects with them?

    Reply
  • June 20, 2013 at 12:33 pm
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    Jim,
    I have a milwaukee sawzall that is a corded high powered 12 A, will that be stout enough? Also I am having trouble finding the 12″ demolition blade in lowes/home depot in the milwaukee brand, so my question is, will blades under other names still fit the milwaukee saw. I know I sound green, and when it comes to the sawzall I am. Anything you can tell me will be greatly appreciated. Have kept my mouth shut about how easy this is suppose to be so others are quite willing to give me there pallets (and even deliver them to my door) just to get them out of there way. How wrong of me is that? No please dont answer that!

    Reply
    • July 22, 2013 at 6:01 am
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      Marty,

      I’m not sure if anybody answered your question. Yes you can use other brands of saws all blades on your Milwaukee. That should not be a problem because they have a universal fit the blade chuck or holder. Good luck with that.

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      • July 22, 2013 at 8:37 am
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        Thanks Mike for answering and good info! I use a lot of different brands of blades in my saw – usually whatever i can find for the least! πŸ™‚

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  • May 9, 2013 at 12:04 am
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    This is incredible! I just started working with old junk to make some crafty little house. Decor and absolutely love it! Your “how to’s” are great!!

    Reply
  • May 4, 2013 at 10:55 pm
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    Hi,
    I am planning on starting the deconstruction of my pallets and you mention that you use a sawsall. I know that it is also called a reciprocating saw. I have a large one but I would like to get a smaller one that would be easier to handle and also with a cord. Can you tell me what brand that you use or recommend? Thank you.

    Reply
    • May 5, 2013 at 10:08 pm
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      I have two that i love. A cordless Porter Cable and a corded one – and they both have been great! Hope that helps,

      Jim

      Reply
  • April 20, 2013 at 6:29 am
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    I’ve been using pallets for a couple of years. I have made potato boxes and compost bins. Potatoe boxes are great. You build it, then fill with 8 in. dirt. Put in seed potatoes. When the plant gets 12 inches tall, you add more dirt. Keep doing it until it’s time to harvest. Then all you have to do is pull out the wood planks starting from the bottom. Reach in and pull out your potatoes. NO DIGGING !

    Reply
    • October 15, 2013 at 4:17 pm
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      Would love more info about your potato boxes. How big are they? Don’t you have to prise the boards off at the bottom, how do you fix them on. I’m a real rookie when it comes to building things Pat.

      Reply
  • April 15, 2013 at 12:06 pm
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    I live in the UK and am following your blog. Love it! reading the pallet blog at the mo,but can you tell me what a ‘sawzall’ is please? I think we probably have another name for it in the UK.Thankyou

    Reply
    • April 15, 2013 at 2:28 pm
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      Thanks so much for the compliments Carol – glad to have you as a reader of the blog! The real name for the saw is a reciprocating saw – and it really does wonders working with pallets! – Jim

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      • April 16, 2013 at 3:27 am
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        Thanks Jim. Am so enjoying reading all the tips on your website.It’s full of the American enthusiasm for ‘doing things’. Just off to buy a reciprocating saw. Will keep you posted!

        Reply
  • April 7, 2013 at 7:19 pm
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    What do you do about finishing the wood? With nail bits won’t it damage your planer?

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  • March 4, 2013 at 9:10 am
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    Can you do it without a sawzaw? I tried a hammer, but the boards split. Frustrating…

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  • February 27, 2013 at 9:09 am
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    Great blog – very informative and inspiring! Question for you: I have access to many pallets and really ike the idea of dis-assembling them. The SawZall idea is great but just wondering if either the 2x4s or the slats (or both) are damaged when the SawZall is used to cut them apart. My plan is to use the wood to build a goat house for my Nigerian Dwarf goats. Thanks!

    Reply
    • February 27, 2013 at 9:22 am
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      Good morning Gene and thank you for the kind words about the blog. Its a pretty quick technique and the boards usually come out clean. If you have a pallet where the boards are nailed really tight – just use a rubber mallet or a hammer with a board to loosen them a little before running the saw blade down through – it will make it a lot easier! Good luck on your project! Jim

      Reply
  • February 25, 2013 at 11:31 pm
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    Do you clean/disinfect wood? I’ve wanted to do a bunch of these projects but my husband tells me the is nasty. Thoughts?

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    • February 26, 2013 at 6:24 pm
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      Katie:
      You can use a power washer and make quick work of cleaning them up. That is what we always use and it leaves the wood nice and clean. We are also pretty selective when finding them – taking only the cleanest we can find. We really have never had to much of a problem with them. I hope that helps and good luck on your projects! Jim

      Reply
  • February 21, 2013 at 1:34 pm
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    Carl- we build a lot of our projects leaving them in to look rustic. For those we want out- we will trim off the two end board with nails and then punch out the middle two nails for a clean board to work with.

    Reply
  • February 21, 2013 at 11:33 am
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    What do you do to address the issue of the nails that remain in the wood?
    It only takes a quick nick into one to ruin an expensive blade on a planer, joiner, or table saw.

    Reply
  • January 26, 2013 at 10:11 am
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    Thank you so much for this tip! We built a pallet cooler box as a gift for relatives, and dismantling the pallets was a nightmare, but the project was so worth it. How much power should I look for in a sawzall? I noticed they range from inexpensive to outrageous. Thanks!

    Reply
    • January 26, 2013 at 10:33 am
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      It really makes it go so much quicker!! The pallet cooler sounds really neat! As for power – you can get away with one of the lesser amperage saws if you will only be using it to cut down pallets. The blade is the real key – buy the long deconstruction blades and it will make quick work of them! If you buy a cordless one – i wouldn’t go any less than 18 volt. Hope that helps! Jim

      Reply
  • January 22, 2013 at 11:15 am
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    I think I struck GOLD when I saw this post! My husband and I are about to embark on a project idea we found on pinterest using pallets to make a wood wall in our basement for a rustic look. Do you have a pinterest page where all your family projects are pictured??

    Reply
  • January 16, 2013 at 8:08 pm
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    Would a jig saw work if I used the right blade?

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    • January 17, 2013 at 6:49 am
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      Annelise – Unfortunately, the jigsaw would not work very well because of the inability to have a flat enough cut for the center pallet boards. Although there are longer jigsaw blade you can buy that would come close – the saw itself would be hard to angle for those cuts. Jim

      Reply
  • December 28, 2012 at 4:48 pm
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    Did you find a plan online for building your chicken coop, it is just beautiful!

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    • December 29, 2012 at 3:00 pm
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      Thank you so much Lindsey for the compliment on the chicken coop…we actually drew up the plans ourselves to be able to use up pallet and shipping crate wood we had. – Jim

      Reply
  • October 26, 2012 at 4:10 pm
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    Thanks for the super time saving ‘tip’ on cutting down a pallet in record time !!.

    Reply
  • October 15, 2012 at 11:13 am
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    Just discovered your blog via Gnowfglins and am enjoying reading your articles. This looks like a great project- any suggestions on where to start looking for pallets? Do most grocery stores use them? We also have a lot of horse farms nearby, would they have them? Thanks so much for any suggestions!

    Reply
    • October 15, 2012 at 12:36 pm
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      So glad to have you visit our blog! We look anywhere and everywhere people take truck deliveries. If you have a local farm and garden store they usually have some lying around – as well as farm implement and parts stores. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  • October 5, 2012 at 6:58 am
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    About to do my first pallet project, so the timing was great for me to see this post. Pretty sure my husband has a Sawzall in the garage! Thanks for the tips!

    Reply
  • September 29, 2012 at 11:11 am
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    Great tutorial. I have about 50 pallets in the barn that are just waiting for me….someday I’ll have a chance to get to them. Thanks for sharing at the All Star Block Party!

    Holly

    Reply
  • September 24, 2012 at 9:03 am
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    I love it! Thanks for sharing these great tips to make the process much more efficient and worthwhile.

    Reply
  • September 22, 2012 at 12:06 pm
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    I’ve been meaning to use a pallet to make a platform for my food pictures. I love what you guys did with it! Thanks for stopping by the link up at ‘Or so she says…’. I would love to have you come back and share some more of your fun ideas. There’s a party going on right now! http://www.oneshetwoshe.com

    Reply
  • September 21, 2012 at 10:33 pm
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    Thanks for info. Now, I must find my husband’s sawzall and get to work on that stack of pallet wood!

    Reply
  • September 20, 2012 at 11:44 pm
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    Now I have an excuse to buy a new power tool! Great tip!

    Reply
  • September 19, 2012 at 8:23 am
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    I’ve been intimidated by the perceived difficulty of taking apart pallets but this looks easy! Thank you so much!

    Reply
  • September 18, 2012 at 6:53 pm
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    Thank you for the timely post. I picked up some pallets from my brother’s feed store and it has finally cooled off enough in Oklahoma to do some of this kind of work. I need to get a compost bin going.

    Reply

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