Wheat Bread Recipe
100% Whole Wheat Bread

A Perfect Everyday Wheat Bread Recipe!

When you buy whole wheat, whole grain, or even 9 grain bread, you believe that is what you are eating, right?  Well guess what…..the majority of breads sold in grocery stores and served in restaurants are actually white bread with less than 2% whole wheat flour.  

It is astonishing to find out that they allowed to market it as whole wheat bread, when the main ingredient is white flour?  Even Subway’s 9 grain wheat bread is primarily made of white flour, with less than 2% making up the other 8 grains.  I don’t know about you, but I have found that reading the labels on my food is becoming more and more important.

Wheat Bread Recipe
Home made wheat bread, sliced and ready to eat!

So, in our quest to know what ingredients we are consuming, we knew we had to come up with a homemade wheat bread recipe that included 100% whole wheat flour and of course, no preservatives.

For those of you that have tried to bake with wheat flour, you will know that you definitely get a denser consistency as compared to white flour.  To put it simply, this is because wheat flour is made from the entire wheat seed rather than just the center, like white flour.  

Using the entire seed allows for extra nutrients and fiber to be included in wheat flour. This whole wheat bread recipe is the best light and fluffy homemade wheat bread that I have found. It is absolutely delicious, contains no preservatives,and best of all, you know what you are eating. Any bread pan works well, but I do love the way stone bread pans help to make this turn out perfect every time.

100% Whole Grain, Whole Wheat Bread Recipe

Ingredients:
2 3/4 cups hot water
4 tablespoon of oil (I use Canola oil)
2 1/2 tablespoons of Agave Nectar
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon salt (I use Kosher salt)
7 cups (max) 100% whole grain wheat flour, divided
2 tablespoons dry active yeast

Instructions:

Wheat Bread Recipe
Add flour until the mixture no longer sticks to the inside of the bowl.

1. Place the first five ingredients in a large mixing bowl and stir to combine. Add 2 cups of whole grain wheat flour. Mix, then add dry active yeast.  Add 4 cups flour, and mix until the consistency is somewhat even.

2. Continue to slowly add flour 1/2 cup at a time until the dough quits sticking to the sides of the bowl. It should be tacky to the touch. The trick is to have enough consistency to stand up with the least amount of flour, so the bread will be fluffy. Do not exceed 7 cups of wheat flour. I use 6 cups.

Wheat Bread Recipe
The dough has been split into two, and ready to be formed for the loaf pans.

3. When your dough is finished, cover the bowl and let it rise for about 40 minutes. The dough will be larger, but it doesn’t need to double when using a heavy mixer. Grease two bread pans with nonstick spray. You can also flour the pans to reduce sticking. Mix the dough again just enough to knock it down at least close to the original size. Drop the dough on a floured surface so you can work and shape it.

Wheat Bread Recipe
Loaves doubled and ready to go in the oven.

4. Roll the dough in the flour and shape it in your hands to make a nice ball, getting enough flour on it so it isn’t sticky. Divide the ball in 1/2 and do it again. Shape the loaves by turning the dough under itself over and over. When the dough is shaped right, the sides and ends will be sealed and all you will see is a nice oblong shaped loaf with smooth sides and top.

5. Place the loaves in your bread pans and let them rise until almost doubled (approximately 40 minutes). Preheat oven to 350 degrees while your dough rises.

6. Bake both loaves for 36 minutes.  Remove from loaf pans and place on cooling racks. Completely cool before storing by wrapping it in  aluminum foil.  ****Do not store in refrigerator, unless you need another brick somewhere****

Enjoy!

Mary and Jim

**If you would like to receive our Recipe Of The Week – be sure to sign up to follow the blog, hit the “like” button on the Facebook sidebar, or follow us on Twitter. This post may contain affiliate links.




100% Whole Grain Whole Wheat Bread
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 3/4 cups hot water
  2. 4 tablespoon of oil (I use Canola oil)
  3. 2 1/2 tablespoons of Agave Nectar
  4. 2 tablespoons honey
  5. 1 tablespoon salt (I use Kosher salt)
  6. 7 cups (max) 100% whole grain wheat flour, divided
  7. 2 tablespoons dry active yeast
Instructions
  1. Place the first five ingredients in a large mixing bowl and stir to combine. Add 2 cups of whole grain wheat flour. Mix, then add dry active yeast. Add 4 cups flour, and mix until the consistency is somewhat even.
  2. Continue to slowly add flour 1/2 cup at a time until the dough quits sticking to the sides of the bowl. It should be tacky to the touch. The trick is to have enough consistency to stand up with the least amount of flour, so the bread will be fluffy. Do not exceed 7 cups of wheat flour. I use 6 cups.
  3. When your dough is finished, cover the bowl and let it rise for about 40 minutes. The dough will be larger, but it doesn't need to double when using a heavy mixer. Grease two bread pans with nonstick spray. You can also flour the pans to reduce sticking. Mix the dough again just enough to knock it down at least close to the original size. Drop the dough on a floured surface so you can work and shape it.
  4. Roll the dough in the flour and shape it in your hands to make a nice ball, getting enough flour on it so it isn't sticky. Divide the ball in 1/2 and do it again. Shape the loaves by turning the dough under itself over and over. When the dough is shaped right, the sides and ends will be sealed and all you will see is a nice oblong shaped loaf with smooth sides and top.
  5. Place the loaves in your bread pans and let them rise until almost doubled (approximately 40 minutes). Preheat oven to 350 degrees while your dough rises.
  6. Bake both loaves for 36 minutes. Remove from loaf pans and place on cooling racks. Completely cool before storing by wrapping it in aluminum foil.
Notes
  1. ****Do not store in refrigerator, unless you need another brick somewhere****
  2. Recipe courtesy of Old World Garden Farms
Old World Garden Farms http://oldworldgardenfarms.com/

27 thoughts on “100% Whole Grain Wheat Bread Recipe

  • June 29, 2015 at 12:51 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for the recepie, I made it and it turned out fantastic!!! Delicious and crunchy! I also added some delicious seeds, like sesame, oat, sunflower and flax. Thank you again!

  • January 3, 2015 at 12:49 pm
    Permalink

    Hi,
    Happy New Year to everybody.
    I have been making breads of all kinds since last 40 years and breads turn out better because we can control salt and sugar in our breads. Also we don’t get fat by any chance because lots of sugar and salt is bad for the body which we all know that.
    I am looking forward to our garden season coming this year.
    thanks
    almas nathoo

  • October 29, 2014 at 1:19 pm
    Permalink

    Can I use a bread machine for this?

  • August 28, 2014 at 5:31 pm
    Permalink

    I made the whole wheat bread and it was quite tasty, however I had a hard time understanding the instructions ,so I re-wrote them,but I do want u to know that I appreciate the info.

  • August 5, 2014 at 10:03 pm
    Permalink

    What Brand or type of whole wheat flour do you use? Your bread looks fantastic! I can almost smell and taste it. GREAT JOB. And thank you for the wonderful information. God Bless. Debbie Wilson

  • June 8, 2014 at 1:40 pm
    Permalink

    Was wondering if it can be frozen??

  • February 9, 2014 at 4:07 pm
    Permalink

    Just a suggestion;

    If you substitute 1/2 C. plain mashed potato or 1/2 C. potato flakes for 1/2 C. flour in this recipe, you’ll get a more tender, moist crumb. I use it in my whole wheat recipes with good results.

    Thistle

  • January 26, 2014 at 9:46 am
    Permalink

    Made this with a friend, turned out wonderful! Thank you.

  • December 5, 2013 at 8:55 am
    Permalink

    How well does this freeze?

    • June 8, 2014 at 1:43 pm
      Permalink

      Was wondering that too 🙂

      • June 8, 2014 at 7:57 pm
        Permalink

        We make two loaves and freeze one for approximately 1-2 weeks. I put it in aluminum foil and place it in a freezer gallon bag. I let it thaw and use it within a week and it works terrific!

  • September 25, 2013 at 9:09 am
    Permalink

    I would like to know if you can make it in a bread machine also

  • August 16, 2013 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    do you have to have a mixer like that for the bread to come out right? I don’t have one but would love to make this bread.

    • September 5, 2013 at 11:16 am
      Permalink

      Hi. I don’t have a stand mixer either. I just used my hands and bread came out great.

    • September 5, 2013 at 11:17 am
      Permalink

      Hi, I don’t have a stand mixer either. I just used my hands and it turned out great.

  • February 19, 2013 at 12:35 pm
    Permalink

    I made this yesterday and it really is great bread. It’s light and fluffy – not dense and heavy like most whole wheat breads. Thank you for sharing it.

  • February 18, 2013 at 4:08 pm
    Permalink

    Bread machine ? Has anyone tried this in a bread machine?

  • February 12, 2013 at 9:05 pm
    Permalink

    I have found one of the best investments I’ve ever made is buying the Tribest flour mill. It doesn’t heat up the grain and you can adjust the grind texture just by moving the top. Plus it is so beautiful. I add 1/4 cup oil of some kind to all my recipes and use home made sweet potato flour (Bake it, dehydrate it) – about 3/4 cup and that keeps the loaves moist.

  • February 3, 2013 at 8:49 pm
    Permalink

    What size loaf pans do you use? THey look a bit larger than mine, so I want to know if I need to alter the division of the dough (or use my commercial loaf thingy).

    • February 4, 2013 at 10:31 am
      Permalink

      I use a 7×3 (pan that my mother passed down to me) or my 8×4 stone loaf pan.

  • January 31, 2013 at 8:11 pm
    Permalink

    Looks wonderful! Thanks so much for sharing this on The HomeAcre Hop!

  • January 31, 2013 at 10:05 am
    Permalink

    Do you know of a substitute for the agave nectar? We can’t get it here very easily and I would love to try this recipe this weekend.

    • January 31, 2013 at 11:03 am
      Permalink

      You can use a variety of sweeteners to substitute for the Agave. Below is a general guideline of how to substitute –
      Honey: Replace with equal amounts.
      · Maple Syrup: Replace with equal amounts.
      · Brown Rice Syrup: Use half as much agave + (up to) 1/2 cup liquid
      · Corn Syrup: Use half as much agave + (up to) 1/3 cup liquid
      · White Sugar: For every 1 cup sugar called for use 2/3 cup agave minus 1/4 cup liquid.
      · Brown Sugar: For every 1 cup sugar called for, use 2/3 cup agave minus 2 tablespoons liquid.

      Hope this helps!

      • January 31, 2013 at 11:32 am
        Permalink

        Thank you so much. It does help – maple syrup I have in abundance.

  • January 26, 2013 at 7:10 pm
    Permalink

    Ooh! I have been looking for an easier whole wheat recipe that doesn’t use sugar and doesn’t get so dry that it falls apart.

  • January 26, 2013 at 4:37 pm
    Permalink

    Hey, what do you know, I was going to make bread today. So, I’ll try your recipe because the rising time is not 4 hours like the one I typically use! Thanks!

Comments are closed.

Please wait...

Sign up to Subscribe to get our OWG articles - free of course!

Want to be notified when our article is published? Enter your email address and name below to be the first to know.
%d bloggers like this: