blackberry honey jam
This recipe will make 4 pints of all natural blackberry jam.

Blackberry Honey Jam – A taste of pure summer! As many of you might recall, a few weeks back we did a recipe post on Strawberry Honey Jam which was made from just 4 natural ingredients (strawberries, apples, honey, and lemon juice).

We received a tremendous amount of comments from those who have made the jelly and loved the flavor, and more from others wanting to know if it could be made with other fruits.  It definitely is a touch thinner than traditional jam made using white sugar and boxed pectin. However, you can’t beat the thought knowing it isn’t loaded with all that sugar.

Ever since we began using that jelly in our house, I have been asked by several family members to try it with blackberries.  Home made blackberry jam has always been a favorite of Jim’s, and we couldn’t resist trying the recipe with a different fruit.

We made a few tweaks to the original recipe to see if we could get the jam a little thicker this time.  By using two large Granny Smith apples, we were able to increase the amount of natural pectin found in the skins of the apples, which made this recipe thicker than the original.  Below is the recipe that I used which made 4 pints plus a few spoonfuls extra.

blackberry honey jam
2 Large Granny Smith Apples are the thickening agent for this recipe

Ingredients:

3 lbs fresh blackberries

1 3/4 cups of honey

2 large Granny Smith apples

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

Instructions:

1. Wash the blackberries and place in a large stock pot.

2. Slice the apple into quarters, removing the core.  Grate the apples, leaving the skin attached. Add to pot.

3. Add honey and lemon juice

4. Heat on high until the mixture begins to boil, reduce and simmer 15 minutes.

5. Use a potato masher or an Immersion Blender to smash your blackberries until you reach a smooth consistency free of chunks.

6. Reduce to medium-low heat and simmer for an additional 15-45 minutes.  You can judge this by the consistency desired.  Reminder – it will thicken when it cools.

Blackberry Honey Jam
Blackberry Honey Jam after being canned.

7.  Place in freezer safe containers, or can using the water bath process for 10 minutes.  It will stay good in the freezer for 6 months, and canned for 12 months.

Side notes:

Typically you do not want to boil honey as it causes enzymes to break down and lose some of the nutrients desired when using honey. However, in this recipe, we are using the honey as a sweetener in place of white sugar and did not want the strong flavor of our local honey to overpower the blackberry flavor.

When picking out your apples – try to find the under ripe apples.  They hold the most pectin. Definitely do not use over ripened apples in this recipe.

Enjoy!

Mary and Jim

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Blackberry Honey Jam
Using Just 4 Natural Ingredients
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Ingredients
  1. 3 lbs fresh blackberries
  2. 1 3/4 cups of honey
  3. 2 large Granny Smith apples
  4. 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Wash the blackberries and place in a large stock pot.
  2. Slice the apple into quarters, removing the core. Grate the apples, leaving the skin attached. Add to pot.
  3. Add honey and lemon juice
  4. Heat on high until the mixture begins to boil, reduce and simmer 15 minutes.
  5. Use a potato masher or an immersion blender to smash your blackberries until you reach a smooth consistency free of chunks.
  6. Reduce to medium-low heat and simmer for an additional 15-45 minutes. You can judge this by the consistency desired. Reminder - it will thicken when it cools.
  7. Place in freezer safe containers, or can using the water bath process for 10 minutes. It will stay good in the freezer for 6 months, and canned for 12 months.
Notes
  1. Typically you do not want to boil honey as it causes enzymes to break down and lose some of the nutrients desired when using honey. However, in this recipe, we are using the honey as a sweetener in place of white sugar and did not want the strong flavor of our local honey to overpower the blackberry flavor.
  2. When picking out your apples - try to find the under ripe apples. They hold the most pectin. Definitely do not use over ripened apples in this recipe.
  3. Recipe courtesy of Old World Garden Farms
Old World Garden Farms http://oldworldgardenfarms.com/

86 thoughts on “Blackberry Honey Jam – No White Sugar

  • July 29, 2016 at 9:35 pm
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    Have you ever replaced the honey with agave?

  • July 12, 2016 at 7:09 pm
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    Does it have to be Granny Smith? I have some green early apples that I can pick unrippened

  • July 11, 2016 at 9:27 pm
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    Could you use this recipe for raspberries as well? Any idea how much honey to use?

  • July 11, 2016 at 4:53 pm
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    Can I use stevia instead of honey? And does the apple flavor come through strong? I’m planning to use wild mulberries for this recipe.

  • June 12, 2016 at 4:20 pm
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    I’ve made this twice, with only 1 lb berries, and with 2. I adjusted the other ingredients accordingly, and it turned out great!! My berries were free, and the cost of the apples and honey made my half pint jars come to 50 cents each.
    I can’t wait to peruse the blog more. Thank you =)

  • May 22, 2016 at 11:35 pm
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    Hi! I loved your post and excited to give this recipe a try. I am a relatively new canner (only 2-3 seasons under my belt) and I was wondering if you can add corn or potato starch in a bit of water to help thicken or does that negatively affect the finished product? Thanks!

  • May 22, 2016 at 4:57 pm
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    I’ve made my own pectin from gooseberries. and if you have green apples, it makes great pectin too

  • May 4, 2016 at 8:52 pm
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    Thanks for the recipe! I was wondering how many pints this would make?

  • May 1, 2016 at 9:24 pm
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    have you tried Agave instead of the honey? I find that it doe not leave that distinct honey aftertaste in jams.

  • April 27, 2016 at 3:21 pm
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    Would it be possible to make this with the blackberry seeds strained out?

    • April 27, 2016 at 3:24 pm
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      Absolutely, no problem at all with that.

    • August 19, 2016 at 9:42 am
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      I would like to make mine seedless but am wondering at what point do I take the seeds out. Do I mash the first and then just cook up the jucie with the honey and apple? Any thoughts would be helpful. thanks

  • February 22, 2016 at 2:40 pm
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    IF YOU WANT TO ADD A 5TH ITEM TO THICKEN FOR PERFECTION TAPIOCA FLOUR MAKES THIS JUST PERFECT!

    • February 23, 2016 at 6:26 am
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      How much tapioca flour? I have been looking for recipes to use up the tapioca flour I have…

      • February 24, 2016 at 9:27 am
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        I USED 2 1/2 TBS BUT YOU NEED TO CONSISTANTLY STIR SO YOU CAN GET A GOOD VISUAL ON HOW THICK YOUD LIKE IT TO BE YOU CAN ALWAYS ADD MORE

  • February 22, 2016 at 8:02 am
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    I don’t know how this would work as I’ve not tried it in jam yet but crab apples are VERY high in pectin from what I read and I am wondering if you’ve tried them as your pectin in any recipes?

  • August 30, 2015 at 10:45 am
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    Have you used wax to seal the jars instead of the hot water bath?

    • September 3, 2015 at 11:45 am
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      Hi Dale – no we only use hot water bath to preserve this recipe.

  • August 5, 2015 at 2:59 pm
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    Love the fact of all natural.

  • August 5, 2015 at 7:23 am
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    Sounds yummy!

  • June 21, 2015 at 9:46 pm
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    Can you use less honey in this recipe and have it work? I made the jam and love it but it’s a bit too sweet for me

  • June 19, 2015 at 4:54 pm
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    How about cactus, plum and grape jelly using natural pectin?

  • June 19, 2015 at 9:31 am
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    I gave up canning a few years ago. But the strawberry & blackberry receipes have inspired me to dig out some canning stuff. I’d like to try Raspberries. Any thoughts on that?

    • June 19, 2015 at 9:44 am
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      Raspberries should work just fine, and glad you are getting back into it!!!!

  • June 18, 2015 at 11:22 am
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    Have you considered using quinces as thickener? They are so full of pectin they are virtually useless for anything else. They were grown for this purpose. We should grow this undervalued apple-like fruit again.

  • June 18, 2015 at 8:46 am
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    Reminds me of my mom & I making jam & jelly ,she used to count the drops coming off the spoon to know how thick it was !

  • June 14, 2015 at 12:42 pm
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    How can you did these with making seedless blackberry jam?

    • June 18, 2015 at 5:46 pm
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      I have the fruit & vegetable strainer attachment for my kitchen aid mixer. I use this to de-seed the blackberries and make my jam from this. Save the seeds and meat for making sweet bread.

  • June 9, 2015 at 1:12 am
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    I prefer to strain my blackberries so I have seedless jam. Would this still work?

    • June 9, 2015 at 5:11 am
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      I see no reason it wouldn’t – and yes – those seeds can be a pain sometimes, not a bad idea!

  • May 19, 2015 at 7:18 pm
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    There is pectin in the recipe. It’s in the apples. πŸ™‚

  • April 30, 2015 at 11:21 pm
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    So after you make the jam you can store it like that on your shelf without refrigerating it? What is the store life?

  • November 3, 2014 at 4:53 pm
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    Looking forward to more healthy recipes with commom ingredients!!

  • September 24, 2014 at 9:56 am
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    I would like to use organic freeze-dried blackberries, but don’t know what amount would be the equivalent of three pounds. .

  • August 27, 2014 at 9:27 am
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    Can this be freezer jam or does it have to be canned? Kind of new to all this. I would love to make it without pectin but don’t have all the materials for canning.

    • August 27, 2014 at 10:54 am
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      Absolutely! Freezing is a great way to start to preserve your own food. Good Luck!

  • August 21, 2014 at 1:22 pm
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    I put the blackberries thru an older juicer to quickly take out some of the seeds, end up with a clumpy juice. I used 4 1/2 cups juice with the two grated apples ( skin included) honey, lemon juice. The flavor is great, but too runny to use for jam-more like syrup. Is there anything I can do to make it thicker? I was wondering if I reprocessed with a little arrowroot powder? any suggestions?

  • August 13, 2014 at 7:26 pm
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    Hi! I followed your recipe, with the conversion that 1 lb of fresh blackberries = 3-3.5cups, so used approx 23 cups of fresh ripe berries. I ended up with 8.5 pints. Is my acidity going to be sufficient for canning, or do I need to start over?

    • August 13, 2014 at 9:36 pm
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      Krista you should be fine with your ratio. The size of the blackberries makes it difficult to determine the exact amount that one pound will yield. We pick wild blackberries, which tend to be smaller than blackberries found in typical grocery stores. Good Luck and thanks for following along our journey!

      • August 13, 2014 at 9:59 pm
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        My ridiculous math skills are to blame for my over-berrying. I can’t even explain how I got to that conclusion math wise as I basically used twice what I needed. So to rectify my mistake, I dumped the jam back into the stock pot, added another 1 3/4 cup honey, 2 more apples and another generous tablespoon of lemon juice. I brought to a boil, simmered 25 min and re-canned in a water bath. Do you think as far as canning safety is concerned, I’m ok? Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. πŸ™‚ Canning with toddlers makes me make rash decisions!

  • August 12, 2014 at 4:28 pm
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    Hello, Mary and Jim! I am THOROUGHLY enjoying your site! I had a question about this jam… Have you tried making it with pears instead of apples? I have a little guy who is allergic to apples (WHAT?! Yeah, I know. That’s what I said!). If you haven’t tried it with pears, do you think it will work? We have an abundance of these lovely, free berries, and I am wanting to make jam with as little sugar as I can. No pectin is a bonus, too! Thank you for all you do! =)

  • July 14, 2014 at 11:42 pm
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    Do you grate the entire apple or just the outside where the skin is present?

  • July 9, 2014 at 9:20 am
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    Instead of Jam, can you make blackberry jelly using this recipe, using the blackberry juice instead of the whole berries?

  • June 29, 2014 at 11:45 pm
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    I typically run my blackberries through a food mill to reduce the amount of seeds. Would I still use 3 pounds of berries after I process them?

  • May 20, 2014 at 11:25 pm
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    Blackberries have already begun turning ripe for picking the past few weeks in Florida panhandle, and I have picked a bunch!!! I made the natural blackberry jam tonight, I have been trying to avoid refined sugars and store pectin. This was delish and super easy to make!! I will be doing more berry picking and jam making!!!

  • March 26, 2014 at 10:11 am
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    Have you tried this with grape jelly?

    • May 11, 2014 at 9:44 am
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      Would this recipe work with agave instead of honey?

  • March 22, 2014 at 9:40 pm
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    I have already got everything I need to make my strawberry jam,I am going to make tomorrow

  • February 13, 2014 at 8:41 pm
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    I’ve always wanted to make my own jellys and jams this sounds easy

  • February 12, 2014 at 3:12 pm
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    I can remember my mother making homemade blackberry jam & jelly without pectin when I was little. I used to help her pick the berries from the blackberry hedge along the side of our property & I remember her telling me to pick about 1/3 of the berries with some red on them. This provided the pectin to thicken the jam/jelly.

  • January 28, 2014 at 5:36 pm
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    Hello!!,will it be fine to use raspberries instead of blackberries???

  • January 26, 2014 at 8:46 pm
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    Do you have any way of doing this without honey. My grandson is highly sensitive to honey, he has never been able to ingest ANY amount of honey without getting sick, sometimes having to go to the hospital.

    • January 26, 2014 at 7:36 pm
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      Yes, Kyttie, you are correct, however, it is a natural sugar – not refined. That is why we chose to use it rather than processed, refined white sugar. It is a healthier option for us.

  • August 16, 2013 at 10:32 pm
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    Thank you for this recipe. Simple, straightforward and best part no processed sugar ! We just picked a ton of blackberries on our property and wanted a simple sugar free blackberry jam recipe – this is perfect :)!

  • July 31, 2013 at 7:05 pm
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    I have blackberries coming out of my ears in the backyard and i found a lovely crabapple tree in the neighborhood and they don’t spray, the crabapples are almost ripe, perfect time for pectin. I’m using local raw organic honey from the general store and *sigh* a store bought lemon lol.

  • July 31, 2013 at 3:35 pm
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    I am very new to this & am making this right now! I’m terrified of doing the hot water bath – when you say put it in a freezer, does that mean I can just put it in mason jars & stick it in the freezer without doing the hot water bath? Or is there something I need to do as well? So excited about tasting it!

    • July 31, 2013 at 4:03 pm
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      As long as your mason jars are freezer safe -absolutely! Most half-pint mason jars and ‘jelly’ jars are designed for freezer use, but make sure yours are or the glass may break. Enjoy!

      • August 1, 2013 at 3:10 pm
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        Thank you for the response! I ended up facing my fear & did the hot water bath – it turned out great!! We made 2 batches and are very excited about it! My 2 year old (& of course my husband) loves it!!

  • June 15, 2013 at 10:01 am
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    Sounds great cant wait to try it

  • June 13, 2013 at 3:56 pm
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    This is fabulous. Thank you so much. Do crabapples contain enough pectin, or is it just granny smith apples? Will any green apple work? Thanks!

    • July 26, 2013 at 12:25 pm
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      You can make homemade pectin from unripe apples and crabapples (either/or or a mixture of the two.) You may not want to include the actual crabapples in your jam, but the pectin from them will be fine.

  • June 13, 2013 at 8:42 am
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    Hello, this sounds great! I wonder if I could use blueberries in place of the blackberries since my hubby dosent like the seeds in anything.

    • July 26, 2013 at 12:21 pm
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      Blueberries are high in natural pectin. You won’t need to add any when making blueberry jam. As far as a sweetener, I use silver maple syrup that we tapped this spring. It does not have the maple taste of traditional maple syrups (sugar maples) and will actually cook down into a sugar. Great for cooking and baking without changing the intended flavor of the finished products.

  • April 3, 2013 at 2:14 pm
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    Hi– I’m really loving your site. New to gardening, but would love to grow a big garden this summer. Do you grow your own strawberries or blackberries for this jam? If so, how successful have you been with them, especially the strawberries? If not, why not?

    Thanks!! You’ve been such a help!

    • April 4, 2013 at 3:12 pm
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      We did not grow the ones in the recipe – but will hopefully soon have our own at the farm. We put in a few last year, and are planting more this spring. We both had them growing up in our families gardens – and both grow well in Ohio.

  • March 23, 2013 at 1:52 pm
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    Hi Mary and Jim,
    I thought I saw plans for a raised garden frame in one of your entries. I looked back and can’t find it. Am I losing it or were the plans in an earlier post?
    Mark

    • March 23, 2013 at 5:06 pm
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      Hi Mark – I had to think back as well, but I do not think we ever have done one on a raised frame. We are going to build some later this year to use in a new hoop house that will go on the farm, so maybe someday I can answer yes to that question :). Thanks so much for following along with us and happy gardening! Jim

  • March 22, 2013 at 5:37 pm
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    Problem with using apples. Regular apples are sprayed with 47 different kinds of pesticides. Organic apples are sprayed with a combination of two antibiotics. So now I am looking for alternatives.

  • March 22, 2013 at 2:07 pm
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    This looks awesome! I need to make my canning list for this year. I would love to have you link up at Inspired Weekends

    Katie @ Horrific Knits

  • March 22, 2013 at 12:11 pm
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    I would like to strain the blackberry juice to remove the seeds. Would that make a differnce in the recipe?

    • March 23, 2013 at 5:27 pm
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      That should be more than fine to do – I know a lot of people that do not like the seeds πŸ™‚

    • March 23, 2013 at 5:28 pm
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      I can only speak for me (chief taster πŸ™‚ ) but I cannot taste it.

  • March 22, 2013 at 10:30 am
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    I made the strawberry jam and it was delicious but my hubby wasnt crazy about how runny it was. It was really good on ice cream and pancakes though! Looking forward to trying the blackberry!

    • May 29, 2013 at 10:53 am
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      Same here, hubby wasn’t excited about how runny it was, but my kids just poured it on bread and ate it. Thinking larger apples will help with that too. May convert the hubs with blackberries though…they’re his favorite!

  • March 22, 2013 at 9:43 am
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    Blackberries – my favorite! Will be more than delighted to leave out the sugar! Thanks for using your gifts to invent and share these recipes with us. Much appreciated!

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