Fresh cut home made artisan bread
Fresh cut home-made artisan bread

This may be the easiest bread recipe you will ever make!  In about 5 to 10 minutes, by simply mixing together 6 simple ingredients – you are on your way to creating fresh artisan bread that not only tastes amazing – but has ZERO preservatives!  No need for kneading – no need for a fancy bread machine – just mix it up, give it about an hour to proof – pop it in the oven and you’re a bread maker!  This recipe makes enough for three loaves.

We bake them all – and keep one for now, and freeze the other two.  An added benefit of this bread is that is has proven to freeze really well for us.  This is a mixed wheat and white flour recipe. We have tried it using a little more wheat, but it really seems the ratio below is the perfect mixture of the two.  Not only is it a great everyday bread – but it has become our go-to bread for making home-made garlic toast and croutons!

Ingredients

4 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour

2 1/4 cups of wheat flour

3 cups of warm water – (warm to the touch – about 90 to 95 degrees)

1 1/2 tablespoons of kosher salt

1 1/2 tablespoons of granular yeast

1/4 teaspoon of black pepper

How To Make:

Mix Ingredients and Cover
Mix Ingredients and Cover
Roll into a ball
Roll into a ball
Make slice in the top of the bread to allow for steam
Make a few slits in the top of the bread before baking to allow for steam

Step 1:   In a large bowl, add the wheat flour, white flour, pepper, yeast, and salt and mix.

Step 2:   Slowly pour in the warm water and mix ingredients.  Don’t feel the need to work your dough at all – just mix for few minutes and your done!

Step 3:   Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough work its magic for about an hour or two.  Place the bowl in the warmest area of the kitchen to aid in rising.

Step 4:   Divide the dough into three even sections and form each into a ball.  Place on a pizza stone or a baking pan that you have dusted with a little flour to prevent from sticking.   Dust the outer edge of each dough ball with a light coat of flour to prevent sticking.

Step 5:   Cover the dough on the pan or stone with a towel and let rest for about 20 to 30 minutes.

Step 6:   Preheat oven to 450 – and right before placing in the oven – take a sharp knife and make a couple of slits in the top of the loaf.  the purpose is to allow the moisture to escape as it bakes – but if you want, you can get fancier with the design on the top πŸ™‚

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes.

We can usually bake two at a time on a large stone – and put the third in after that to bake. One final hint – if you place a pan of water on the rack below the baking bread – it helps the bread stay moist and bake even.

There you have it!  Your own home-made artisan bread!

Mary

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Artisan Bread Recipe
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Ingredients
  1. 4 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour
  2. 2 1/4 cups of wheat flour
  3. 3 cups of warm water - (warm to the touch - about 90 to 95 degrees)
  4. 1 1/2 tablespoons of kosher salt
  5. 1 1/2 tablespoons of granular yeast
  6. 1/4 teaspoon of black pepper
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, add the wheat flour, white flour, pepper, yeast, and salt and mix.
  2. Slowly pour in the warm water and mix ingredients. Don't feel the need to work your dough at all - just mix for few minutes and you are done!
  3. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough work its magic for about an hour or two. Place the bowl in the warmest area of the kitchen to aid in rising.
  4. Divide the dough into three even sections and form each into a ball. Place on a pizza stone or a baking pan that you have dusted with a little flour to prevent from sticking. Dust the outer edge of each dough ball with a light coat of flour to prevent sticking.
  5. Cover the dough on the pan or stone with a towel and let rest for about 20 to 30 minutes.
  6. Preheat oven to 450 - and right before placing in the oven - take a sharp knife and make a couple of slits in the top of the loaf. the purpose is to allow the moisture to escape as it bakes - but if you want, you can get fancier with the design on the top πŸ™‚
  7. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes.
Notes
  1. We can usually bake two at a time on a large stone - and put the third in after that to bake. One final hint - if you place a pan of water on the rack below the baking bread - it helps the bread stay moist and bake even.
  2. Recipe courtesy of Old World Garden Farms
Old World Garden Farms http://oldworldgardenfarms.com/
 

52 thoughts on “Homemade Artisan Bread Recipe – Prepared In Minutes!

  • November 3, 2016 at 7:52 pm
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    I just baked your bread recipe and used Active Dry Yeast. I read on the yeast package which states to dissolve in 1/4 cup warm liquid with 1 tsp. sugar to activate the yeast. I did not do this, and the bread is very dense with no air pockets. The crust is beautiful with a great taste. Next time I will follow the yeast directions.
    Thank you for posting this recipe, looking forward to making it again πŸ™‚

  • November 2, 2016 at 8:53 pm
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    HELLO, AND THANK YOU FOR THE RECIPES!.. I LOVE TO PUT RECIPES ON MY TIMELINE, AND OF COURSE I AM ALWAYS SURE TO PUT WHO POSTED THEM AND WHO THEY BELONG TO!!… THIS SURE LOOKS GOOD!,, I LOVE DIFFERENT BREAD RECIPES,,, I DON’T GET OUT MUCH, BECAUSE OF HEALTH ISSUES, SO BLESS YOU FOR POSTING!… MARYJO…

  • August 13, 2016 at 9:18 pm
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    I just made this bread with all purpose flour only, to go along with our home made soup for dinner tonite. It came out AWESOME!!! Thanks so much for a great go to recipe! I will be making this often!

  • December 28, 2015 at 4:54 am
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    What is the difference between all-purpose flour and wheat flour? I live inFrance and I can get bread flour with a higher gluten content or plain flour r flour with a raising agent in it for cakes…

  • June 3, 2015 at 12:35 am
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    Hello I just bought a GF flour that says you can exchange it for any type of flour, so I’m going to try your recipe with my flour and see how it turns out. I’ll be sure to let you know how it goes. Thanks for getting back to me :-).

  • June 1, 2015 at 8:15 pm
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    Would you happen to know if this bread recipe can be made gluten free by switching out both types of flour with an all-purpose gluten free flour mixture? I’m new to being gluten free and have not learned how to convert recipe’s yet. Any advice you have would be appreciated. πŸ™‚

    • June 1, 2015 at 8:28 pm
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      Sorry Rose, I have never tried to make it that way, but if the flours are interchangeable, I would guess that it would work. Please let us know if it works!

      • June 3, 2015 at 12:36 am
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        Hello I just bought a GF flour that says you can exchange it for any type of flour, so I’m going to try your recipe with my flour and see how it turns out. I’ll be sure to let you know how it goes. Thanks for getting back to me :-).

        P.S. Sorry I posted this in the wrong place the first time. I would delete the other comment if I knew how…

  • May 26, 2015 at 10:50 pm
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    Could you sub all white flour if you don’t stock wheat?

  • January 11, 2015 at 11:35 am
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    Hello πŸ™‚
    Is there any way you could translate the cups of flour to kg/g and the cups of water to liters? It seems like there is a million different versions of “a cup” if you search on google πŸ™‚ much appreciated πŸ™‚

  • January 11, 2015 at 8:34 am
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    I have put a pizza stone in a hot oven and it broke. I was told never to do that always start the oven when the stone go,s in. Any tips on that?

    • January 11, 2015 at 8:45 am
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      I always put my stones in a hot oven as long as the stones are at room temperature. I sometimes place the stone on the stove top as the oven warms so it gets a little warmer before I put it in the oven. Keeping my fingers crossed – I haven’t had one break yet.

  • October 9, 2014 at 5:18 pm
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    Great dinner bread. Suggest you try it with some crock pot apple butter. Picture available upon request. Thanks for providing all of the recipes.

  • August 13, 2014 at 7:24 pm
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    it’s just me and my husband, we don’t eat a lot of bread anymore. Can I cut the recipe to make just 1 loaf?

    • August 13, 2014 at 9:37 pm
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      Absolutely! We actually freeze one loaf so it is ready when we finish the first loaf.

  • July 24, 2014 at 4:15 pm
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    Can you use all ap flour or bread flour and AP !

    • July 25, 2014 at 11:22 am
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      Yes – all purpose or bread flour would work — or a combination.

  • May 27, 2014 at 4:32 pm
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    Try putting a cast iron skillet with 1 cup of ice cubes on the bottom shelf of the oven when you put the bread in. It helps make a moist loaf and a nice, crispy crust.

  • April 16, 2014 at 8:34 pm
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    I preheat a 3 1/2 quart cast iron pot with lid (no plastic knobs) in a 450 degree oven, 15 minutes before the dough has risen to it highest, then remove pot from oven (very hot), remove lid, toss in a little corn meal, throw the bread dough in, put the lid back on, and pop back into oven for about 20-30 minutes. Remove pot (very hot) from oven, remove lid, and using wooden spoon, pop bread onto a cooling rack for 1 hour. Enjoy. (I do it this way because I don’t have a stone, and it steams while in the pot, making a nice moist bread with crispy crust.) Love the recipe, and your site!!!

  • March 27, 2014 at 8:25 pm
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    This was an excellent tasting bread!

  • March 9, 2014 at 7:20 pm
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    Just baked. Hot bread…YUM!

  • February 19, 2014 at 10:56 pm
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    I’ve been trying to track down a cranberry jalopeno bread recipe that’s yeast risen. Do you have any idea how to make this type of bread? Do you think adding these into this recipe would work or would the dough fail to rise?

    • February 20, 2014 at 3:30 pm
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      I’m not sure how that would work with it Leslie – but the cranberry jalapeno bread sounds amazing! Jim and Mary

  • December 29, 2013 at 3:04 pm
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    Hello – I look forward to making this recipe. I’m not familiar with “granular yeast”. Can you tell me if you used Active Dry yeast? Or Rapid Rise yeast?

    Thank you so much for sharing the recipe and for any help on the type of yeast to use.

    Chey

    • December 29, 2013 at 3:23 pm
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      No problem – we used Active Dry Yeast. Good luck on the recipe – let us know how it turns out! Jim and Mary

  • December 17, 2013 at 9:57 pm
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    I tried it did not turn out what type of yeast should I use I think the one I used was not the right one or just bad luck thinking it was wrong yeast

  • December 6, 2013 at 3:26 pm
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    can I use this receipe for rye bread

    • January 11, 2015 at 8:29 am
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      Maybe your water was to hot and that will kill the yeast.

  • December 4, 2013 at 11:19 am
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    Tip: Be sure to use your dry measuring cup also for water so the dough will not be too liquid.

  • November 11, 2013 at 8:22 pm
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    Made this for the first time today. The whole family loved it. I can’t ever just follow a recipe though so I added (from our garden) dried oregano, sweet basil and purple basil. It was so good. I’ll be making this again.

  • November 6, 2013 at 9:51 am
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    This looks delicious! I am trying to cut back on gluten, so do you think I could substitute the white flour with oat or rice flour?

  • October 17, 2013 at 3:55 pm
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    Thank you! Can’t wait to try it. πŸ™‚

  • October 17, 2013 at 1:47 pm
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    So you don’t have to preheat the stone? Just put it in with the bread dough on it cold? Then for the third one the stone would be hot?? The only thing I have ever used my stone for is pizza, and we always preheat the stone.

    • October 17, 2013 at 2:16 pm
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      You can if you like – and it is fine to have it warm for the third one. I usually just watch the bread a little closer to make sure it is not getting overdone on the the second one.

  • July 19, 2013 at 6:18 am
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    Great recipe to use as bread bowls…for my white chicken chili recipe this fall
    !! Thank you!

  • April 17, 2013 at 10:30 pm
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    omg this recipe is amazing! im eating the hot, fresh bread right now! I had to add about 1/2 cup more water but i didnt measure the flours very well lol. super easy! thank you!

    • April 15, 2013 at 10:29 am
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      Hi Gloria – not yet – but we are working to add that to the blog πŸ™‚

      • April 15, 2013 at 10:58 am
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        I have made this recipe twice now, love it, so easy. I use less salt. And the second time I made it into two loaves instead of three and baked for 35 min. Perfect.

    • October 18, 2013 at 12:55 pm
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      I just copied the section that I needed, saved it, and then printed it off. Worked like a charm.

  • April 7, 2013 at 3:11 pm
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    I just made this, turned out great with very crunchy crust. Does it have to have that much salt? I would like it better with less salt. thanks, Nancy

    ________________________________

  • April 7, 2013 at 3:05 pm
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    Does it have to have this much salt? I just made it, love how crunchy the crust is! Great recipe. Just think I would like it better with less salt.

  • April 5, 2013 at 2:50 pm
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    How does this work made in loaf pans?

      • April 5, 2013 at 2:46 pm
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        Thank you! Looking forward to making it soon!

      • October 18, 2013 at 12:59 pm
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        I added some twelve grain cereal (cooked it first) to this bread. This recipe worked great as well. Real old world multigrain bread.

  • April 5, 2013 at 11:34 am
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    What type of yeast do you use? Instant or Active dry yeast? Or something else?

  • April 5, 2013 at 8:59 am
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    It looks delicious! I’m making this this weekend! Thanks!

  • April 5, 2013 at 8:54 am
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    Yumm….looks really good! Hello from another Ohioian! πŸ™‚

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