simple tips overview

We have divided all of our Garden, Landscape and Compost articles and tips into 3 easy to find categories – just click on the category picture below to view all of our past articles and posts on each subject.

Happy Gardening! Β – Β  Jim and Mary

CLICK ON EACH PICTURE BELOW TO VIEW ALL OF OUR ARTICLES AND POSTS IN EACH CATEGORY:

TIPS FROM THE GARDEN
1. TIPS AND ARTICLES FROM THE VEGETABLE GARDEN
2. Tips On Composting
2. TIPS AND ARTICLES ON MAKING AND USING COMPOST
Tips From The Landscape
3. Β TIPS AND ARTICLES FOR YOUR FLOWERBEDS AND LANDSCAPE
Tips on Growing Cover Crops
4. TIPS ON GROWING COVER CROPS FOR YOUR GARDEN
Why And How To Plant Fruit Trees In The Fall
WHY AND HOW TO PLANT FRUIT TREES IN THE FALL

0 thoughts on “Garden & Landscape TIPS

  • January 20, 2015 at 9:40 am
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    Just found your site recently and am really enjoying your tips, recipes, and gardening. I do have a question, I’m in SW FL so my small garden is almost ready. Is there a liquid fertilizer I can use. My tomatoes are large and beginning to turn, but I keeping fonding them on the ground wit bugs inside and out. Any suggestions?

    Reply
  • January 16, 2015 at 4:12 pm
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    Hi Jim,
    I spoke to you this morning, we are interested in a pergola. Do you design and install them.

    Joy

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    • January 16, 2015 at 4:30 pm
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      Hi Joy – we do design and build them complete – but we do not install. However – that being said – our pergolas are all cut and marked and ready for an easy install by a landscaper or contractor or the homeowner. Feel free to shoot me an email at thefarm@owgarden.com if you have any other questions at all. Thanks so much – Jim

      Reply
  • September 30, 2014 at 8:17 pm
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    Can’t wait to make the Irish Soda Bread.

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  • August 19, 2014 at 7:30 am
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    I would like the full instructions on hoe to plant the vertical potatoes.

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    • August 20, 2014 at 1:10 pm
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      Loretta – we will be doing an article on just that topic before Spring! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  • June 12, 2014 at 2:33 pm
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    by any chance to do have comments on how to make wood containers to plant your tomatoes, peppers etc. in to where you will not have to plant in ground where all the grass and etc. is?

    Reply
  • April 27, 2014 at 7:56 am
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    Getting excited about the garden tour coming up! When will details be e-mailed to us?

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    • April 27, 2014 at 8:01 am
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      We are too Pat! We are sending out directions and details on Monday to everyone who signed up!

      Reply
  • March 27, 2014 at 12:33 am
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    Enjoy your posts..Please include me.Going to make the strawberry jam.I am eating gluten free and do not eat white things or sugars.

    Reply
  • September 30, 2013 at 12:13 pm
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    Trying to read about Cover crops and when I click on the image, i only get the image and no articles. If you could share…thanks.

    Reply
  • July 6, 2013 at 4:05 pm
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    I have spent the last couple of hours enjoying every bit of your website. You are most inspiring!

    However, I’ve looked everywhere and can’t find anything about those Hay Bale Crate planters for zucchini, squash and cucumbers. I saw the pic, and this would be perfect for our garden. Bending and gathering the huge bounty of these plants is always back breaking work… not to mention my personal issue with being allergic to the leaves. Please, please….. teach me!

    Reply
  • August 30, 2012 at 2:50 pm
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    Thank you for replying. Yes that would certainly answer for the amount of new weeks we got as the grass clippings came from the common area of our townhouse complex and that does have a lot of weeks mixed in with the grass. Will make sure to get it into our composting this time. Thank you again πŸ™‚

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  • August 29, 2012 at 2:07 pm
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    You mention putting grass clippings in your composting. We have a plot at a community garden and someone had told me husband you can use this. So he collected bags of grass clippings from our townhouse complex when maintenance was done mowing one day last fall and just placed it on our garden and then rototilled it into the dirt…. well this year I have been pulling out grass all over the garden. I said it was from the grass that he put in there last year and he said there was no way, as nurseries had told him grass clippings are good.. they should have gone into our compost bin first to decompose right?

    Reply
    • August 29, 2012 at 4:14 pm
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      Sally – Normally, i would say that your husband and the nurseries are correct – that they are good for your garden and wouldn’t give you grass. HOWEVER…If the grass was tall and was going to seed when they cut it – then yes, there is a good chance that those seeds came back as grass in your garden, along with any weed seeds that might have been in the clippings. The best thing would have been to put them in your compost pile and let them decompose and heat up – which it it reaches a good temperature – kills any seeds and results in great compost. Hope that helps, and thanks for stopping by our blog πŸ™‚

      Reply
  • July 29, 2012 at 9:12 pm
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    I really want to do this. Thanks for the tips. I’m hosting a linky party “One Creative Weekend” at OneCreativeMommy.com. I’d love for you to visit and link up this idea and/or anything else you’d like to share.

    Reply
  • July 25, 2012 at 2:57 pm
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    Watermelon rinds should go to your chickens…they’ll love ’em!

    Reply
  • July 24, 2012 at 2:44 am
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    Finally the answer as to turning the pile… Well I aint been doing that…ops. I made my bin from 2/3 of a 55 gallon plastic barrell. I cut a hole wider than my shovel about 8 inches high. Drilled 3/4 inch holes all around. Think I need more! Grass clippings and canning scraps tops the list. I added some goat droppings as it fills up. I recon I will have to put a cover over it. We have had a lot of unseasonalbe rain this July. Not going to complain at all!!! Thanks for publishing this information……

    Reply
  • May 26, 2012 at 9:34 pm
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    Thanks for stopping by and for the compliment on the post. We use so much from our kitchen and yard that we really never have a problem generating scraps. This past week we put in watermelon rines, potato peels, eggshells, coffee grounds, grass clippings, manure from the chickens. If you have trouble generating enough – check with local restaurants – a lot will give their scraps for compost piles – and coffee houses are known to save the grounds for customers as well – all for free.

    Jim and Mary

    Reply
  • May 26, 2012 at 9:09 pm
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    How do you get enough scraps to have a large compost pile? I can’t generate that much. Thanks for the post. Like Jennifer said, you make it sound easy.

    Reply
  • May 21, 2012 at 10:06 am
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    Oh and I found your blog via The Prairie Homestead’s Barn Hop! πŸ™‚

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  • May 21, 2012 at 10:06 am
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    Thanks for the primer on composting! You make it sound a lot easier than others do πŸ˜‰

    One quick question: how far away from your house do you have your compost pile? We live in the city and have about 1/4 acre but our house sits smack in the middle of it all. So I am trying to decide, distancewise, where to place it.

    Reply
    • May 21, 2012 at 10:14 am
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      We are glad to have you here at our blog – and thanks for stopping by from the Barn Hop! We put our compost bin right at the back of our garden – just for the ease of putting garden waste into it. The real key is to place it somewhere where it is convenient to get to – and you will use it so much more!

      Jim and Mary

      Reply

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