An easy way to make some hot and spicy tomato juice to can!

So as the garden season nears the end – are you are left with still more tomatoes and peppers?  Here is a quick and easy recipe to turn those extras into a great tasting hot and spicy tomato juice.

Although regular canned tomato juice is fantastic to use throughout the year – how about turning a few of those canned jars into a hot and spicy tomato juice drink.  Not only is it a great tasting and refreshing drink – but you can use it to liven up homemade chili, make a spicy spaghetti sauce, or use as a great base for a bloody mary.

Here’s How:

( This recipe will make enough to can about 6 quarts of juice )

Start with the following garden fresh ingredients:

Tomato juice is a great way to use up those ripening tomatoes on the vine

40 to 50 medium tomatoes (Use them all up here – Roma, Celebrity, Big Boy and any others you have)
2 onions (sweet yellow or vidalia work best)
2 red peppers
2 green peppers
4 jalapeno peppers
4 cayenne peppers
2 seranno peppers

4 Cajun Belles (optional)
4 cloves of garlic

If you have a food processor – chop up all the above ingredients (seeds and all) into a liquidy pulp and place on low to medium heat and cook down for an hour or so, stirring often to avoid scorching the bottom of the pan. If you don’t have a food processor – no worries – just chop up into small pieces and throw in a large pot and cook down..it may take a little longer – but it works just as well. The important thing is to get the tomato and vegetable mixture soft and cooked down to run it easily through a strainer or food mill.

When the mixture has heated and cooked down – strain it through a food mill into a clean pot to remove all of the skins and seeds.

Now add your spices (add to taste – some like a little more – some a little less)
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 teaspoon of celery salt
1/2 teaspoon of garlic salt

Heat on a low simmering boil for another 30 to 45 minutes.
Simply can up into quart jars, put on your lids and then water bath for 30 minutes. (You can also pressure can it for 12 minutes instead of the water bath)  You are left with some great tasting hot and spicy tomato juice around to enjoy through the winter months!   – Jim and Mary

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Hot and Spicy Tomato Juice
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Ingredients
  1. 40 to 50 medium tomatoes (Use them all up here - Roma, Celebrity, Big Boy and any others you have)
  2. 2 onions (sweet yellow or vidalia work best)
  3. 2 red peppers
  4. 2 green peppers
  5. 4 jalapeno peppers
  6. 4 cayenne peppers
  7. 2 seranno peppers
  8. 4 Cajun Belles (optional)
  9. 4 cloves of garlic
Instructions
  1. If you have a food processor - chop up the tomatoes, onion, peppers and garlic (seeds and all) into a liquidy pulp and place on low to medium heat and cook down for an hour or so, stirring often to avoid scorching the bottom of the pan. If you don't have a food processor - no worries - just chop up into small pieces and throw in a large pot and cook down. It may take a little longer - but it works just as well. The important thing is to get the tomato and vegetable mixture soft and cooked down to run it easily through a strainer or food mill.
  2. When the mixture has heated and cooked down - strain it through a food mill into a clean pot to remove all of the skins and seeds.
  3. Now add black pepper, celery and garlic salt. Add to taste - some like a little more - some a little less
  4. Heat on a low simmering boil for another 30 to 45 minutes.
  5. Simply can up into quart jars, put on your lids and then water bath for 30 minutes.
Notes
  1. Recipe courtesy of Old World Garden Farms
Old World Garden Farms http://oldworldgardenfarms.com/

15 thoughts on ““Wow – I Could Have Made My Own V-8!” Can Your Own Hot and Spicy Tomato Juice

  • April 9, 2016 at 8:56 am
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    Wow! It is looking so lovely. I really enjoyed your blog. My mother becomes fan of your recipe. She loves it very much.

  • August 12, 2014 at 7:58 am
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    I’m wondering if you know approximately how many pounds of tomatoes you use? My tomatoes are of such varying sizes… Thanks!

  • July 14, 2014 at 10:18 pm
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    Can this recipe be halved?

  • July 2, 2013 at 2:29 pm
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    Hello,
    I am gearing up to make your V8 juice and am wondering what the relative poundage was for the tomatoes. Mine are far from being in and I have the opportunity to purchase them in 25lbs boxes for a great price. Mine will be quite big. I am thinking, 10-15 lbs.?
    Thanks,
    Sara

  • September 23, 2012 at 11:03 am
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    Hello from scotland I am going to try it love it.
    .

    • September 23, 2012 at 11:07 am
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      Graham – We are so glad to have you visit our blog from Scotland!! You will have to let us know how it turns out! Jim and Mary

  • September 22, 2012 at 10:52 am
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    That sounds really good. I’d be tempted to add whatever other veggies I had at the time – celery, carrot, etc. What do you do with the leftover pulp, skins, etc.? Compost?

    • September 22, 2012 at 5:56 pm
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      Janet – That would be good as well! And yes – we compost the the pulp and skins in our pile. Thanks for stopping by our blog! – Jim and Mary

  • August 27, 2012 at 8:05 am
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    I too just made my own V8 juice! It taste so much better and I am am glad I never have to buy it again.

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  • August 25, 2012 at 7:53 am
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    being that it has peppers in it, doesn’t it need to be pressure canned? I’m a novice canner so I really don’t know, just curious. Love your site. You are living my dream. I’m in Ohio also, near Cleveland. Thanks for all the inspiration you’ve provided!

    • August 25, 2012 at 8:14 am
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      Hi Vicky – thanks for stopping by our blog – and good to hear from a fellow Ohioan πŸ™‚ As for the water bath of the juice – it is highly acidic due to the tomatoes. It mainly only retains the heat and flavor of all of the peppers during the cook down process. Most of the pepper flesh and all of the seeds are removed with the colander. There are also many salsa recipes that include peppers and onions, etc in them that can still be safely water bathed as well following the recipes. With our spicy tomato juice – we do pressure can it simply because we think it’s easier to do than water bathing. Hope that helps πŸ™‚ – and good luck with the canning!!!!
      Jim

    • September 3, 2012 at 9:13 pm
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      Everything I’m finding indicates that it is NOT SAFE to water bath can onions and peppers, so, I would pressure can these at 240 deg. F (10 lbs. pressure), 15 minutes for quarts and 10 minutes for pints if you are at 2,000 altitude or lower; over that, add 2-3 minutes, depending on how high up you are. Other than that, this looks like an awarding-winning recipe, and can’t wait to try it!

      • September 3, 2012 at 9:21 pm
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        We pressure can ours just because I like to do that whenever I work with anything that is not strictly tomato based. However, in our pressure canner guide, and even the Ball canning recipe guides for some pepper and onion recipes for salsa – they have numerous safe water bathing methods. It is a great point you make – pressure canning is the absolute safest way to go- but there are approved recipes for water bathing.

  • August 24, 2012 at 10:46 am
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    This sounds great! I like to drink hot and spicy v-8. I think I will try to make my own. Thanks for the recipe.

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