SNOW???? In October???  Yes, it is hard to believe that Jim and I were out in the garden this past weekend picking our last green and sweet bell peppers and 3 days later it is was snowing on the morning drive to work!  I guess it isn’t that surprising – we do live in Ohio. Like the old saying goes, if you don’t like the weather here, stick around a day or two, it will change.

vegetable stock
As an added bonus, you can use the leftovers to make your own, healthy chicken stock.

This week’s cold weather got me in the mood to make old-fashioned comfort food. Chicken and noodles over mashed potatoes, rustic chicken noodle soup, potato soup….you get the point.  As the temperature decreases, the need for stock increases. That doesn’t mean go to the grocery and open a box or can and pour it in.  I am talking about pure homemade broth made from the leftovers in your kitchen.  It is one of the easiest canning recipes that you can make!

This week was a perfect time to pull out those lonely celery stalks, scraps of onions and carrots, and even the garlic scapes that have been taking up room in the kitchen freezer for the last month.  Use as many vegetables as you want to make a vegetable stalk, or if you have leftover chicken bones, throw those in for traditional chicken broth. Although you can freeze stock – today I wanted to use my pressure cooker one more time – a sort of send off to the canning season – and also save valuable room in our freezer!  Can’t wait to bring it back out in the spring!!!!

Homemade Chicken ( or Vegetable) Stock Recipe

Makes approximately 4 quarts

Ingredients:

Vegetable scraps – celery, onion, carrots, etc…
Chicken bones/parts (omit if making vegetable stock)
Salt
Pepper
Parsley

**amounts not specified because it depends on what you have on hand, and how your like your stock.  Ours never turns out the same but it is always delicious and flavorful!

Instructions:

vegetable stock
Making stock is a great time to use up all of those leftover veggy scraps!

1. Place all ingredients into a large stock pot and cover with water

***Option – Place all ingredients in a crock pot and cover with water

2. Bring to a boil and simmer for at least 4 hours

***Option – Place crock pot on low and let heat through overnight (10-12 hours)

vegetable stock
Straining the chicken stock

3. Strain liquid in another large pot and bring back to a boil.

4. Place liquid in heated and sterilized canning jars – add a heated lid and ring and place in pressure canner.

5. Follow your instructions for your pressure canner and process quart jars for 25 minutes at 10 lbs of pressure (altitudes less than 1,000 feet), and pint jars for 20 minutes.

***Option – if you don’t have a pressure canner don’t worry – you can still freeze your broth — Just place cooled broth in a freezer safe container.  Check out how we froze ours here.

Enjoy!

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Mary and Jim




How to Make Chicken or Vegetable Stock
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Ingredients
  1. Vegetable scraps - celery, onion, carrots, etc...
  2. Chicken bones/parts (omit if making vegetable stock)
  3. Salt
  4. Pepper
  5. Parsley
  6. **amounts not specified because it depends on what you have on hand, and how your like your stock. Ours never turns out the same but it is always delicious and flavorful!
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients into a large stock pot and cover with water
  2. ***Option - Place all ingredients in a crock pot and cover with water
  3. Bring to a boil and simmer for at least 4 hours
  4. ***Option - Place crock pot on low and let heat through overnight (10-12 hours)
  5. Strain liquid in another large pot and bring back to a boil.
  6. Place liquid in heated and sterilized canning jars - add a heated lid and ring and place in pressure canner.
  7. Follow your instructions for your pressure canner and process quart jars for 25 minutes at 10 lbs of pressure (altitudes less than 1,000 feet), and pint jars for 20 minutes.
Notes
  1. ***Option - if you don't have a pressure canner don't worry - you can still freeze your broth -- Just place cooled broth in a freezer safe container.
  2. Recipe courtesy of Old World Garden Farms
Old World Garden Farms http://oldworldgardenfarms.com/

17 thoughts on “Simple Homemade Chicken or Vegetable Stock Recipe – Can or Freeze

  • December 27, 2015 at 12:55 pm
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    Perfect timing! Went to the kids house yesterday (day AFTER Christmas) to enjoy a huge Christmas turkey dinner with all the fixings. I mentioned that the turkey bones will make a lovely broth for her. She looked at me as if I lost my last brain cell! I asked what she intended to do with the “mess” (her words, not mine). “Throw it away as soon as possible”, was her reply.

    I asked if I could take it home, make stock with it and I would give her some real-homemade stock. At this point she KNEW I lost my marbles! Got that huge turkey “mess” wrapped-up, home, in the frig and it’s bound for the pot today. I’m looking forward to adding some wholesome turkey broth to our pantry.

    Thanks for all your inspiring and uplifting posts. I can’t wait to hear about all the progress you achieve in 2016.

  • April 21, 2014 at 9:19 am
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    Have you ever condensed your stock before freezing or canning it?

    I did it accidentally with chicken broth once, and got a paste almost like you can buy in the jars–ended up freezing ice cubes and reconsituting as needed.

    I am thinking about doing it in a purposeful manner to save space, and wondered if you had ever tried it.

  • January 19, 2014 at 6:08 pm
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    I live in Ohio also. Do u have a spring and summer time line for gardening and canning that has worked for u?

    • January 20, 2014 at 2:40 pm
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      Hi Joyce and fellow Ohioan! πŸ™‚ We don’t have an actual timeline – but something maybe we can create in the future. We pretty much can as items come into season throughout the year – so strawberries, blackberries come first – then followed by the beans, tomatoes, peppers, and we end up with the apples last πŸ™‚

  • January 17, 2014 at 9:11 am
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    What happened in the days before pressure canners? Cold packers were used and did they not work? Wouldn’t a lot of people have died if it wasn’t safe?

    • January 17, 2014 at 11:54 am
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      Some people did die, or developed neurological problems they didn’t know the cause of. Botulin spores are, luckily for humans, not so common that they’ll be in every batch, and the toxin can be deactivated if heated at a strong boil for long enough. But it’s a huge risk to take, with the consequences being blindness, organ failure, or death, and just a little toxin can have severe consequences.

      Before pressure canning, jars did frequently lose their seal or break in storage – explode, even, from the buildup of gases, especially in the days before two-part lids. I remember reading about jars exploding in the pantry in one of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books; it was apparently a common experience, if frustrating and messy.

  • November 24, 2013 at 11:04 am
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    I like to pour my broth into muffin tins to freeze. This makes a 1/4 serving which I can grab out of the freezer for those recipes that only need a small amount of broth.

  • October 25, 2013 at 2:08 pm
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    Can you not “can” the chicken or veg broth even if you DON’T have a pressure cooker? I don’t want to freeze it & I have canned chx broth in the past – just don’t know how long I did it.

    • October 30, 2013 at 11:38 am
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      Vicky, Chicken or any kind of protein based broth MUST BE pressure canned to be safe

      • November 22, 2013 at 11:23 am
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        Vegetable-only stock needs pressure canned, too, since it’s not acidic enough to prevent the growth of botulin spores, and boiling doesn’t kill them.

  • October 25, 2013 at 11:17 am
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    Put the canner away??? Now??? Great time to can dry beans for quck meals, or deer camp! Meat sales and thin out the extra roosters and lazy hens. And leftover turkey and ham from the holidays too! And I still have pumpkins to do, and this years crop of potatos, and frozen berrys to become jelly and jam too! The extra heat now is most welcome in the house!! LOL Maybe put canner away in Jan or Feb!

  • October 25, 2013 at 10:33 am
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    Just remembered that there are two small zucchini left in the garden! Whoops!! Fortunately, here in downtown Columbus (OH) we don’t get the cold quite as much as you in the more rural parts of central Ohio! Still, while my 9 grain bread is baking, I’d better go pick those zucchini!

  • October 25, 2013 at 10:05 am
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    I’m big into garden canning. I can stretch a baked chicken out to about 9 dinners for 2 adults (18 servings). After it’s baked we eat 2 dinners from it (breast and drums). After that it goes into a huge cook pot and is steamed and de-boned. Then I add all my garden veggies to it, onions, garlic, potatoes, zucchini (I never lose a zucchini), yellow squash, green beans, swiss chard, kale & pak choy. All my garden grown herbs, sage, chives, marjoram, sweet bay leaf & rosemary. I’ll sometimes add barley, mung beans, black-eyed peas, split peas or another bean. This will make about 7 quarts. I can-up 6 quarts for the pantry then have about 1 quart left over for the next dinner. I try to do this 2 times a week. You can build your pantry up pretty fast! I’m going on 3 years of not buying canned soups, vegetables or jam. NOTE: Ask your neighbors about their unwanted (un-carved) pumpkins after Halloween. It’s great to put up for future soups, pies and butters!

  • October 25, 2013 at 8:52 am
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    Always enjoy your posts! Had the same experience here in Ohio. So glad I got the last of the produce out of the garden before this cold snap!
    I have been buying meat when it is on an extremely good sale and canning it for future use. I wish we had our own meat, but that is not an option at this time Nevertheless, it is so convenient–not to mention, cheaper, to be able to have the canned meat.

    • October 25, 2013 at 5:11 pm
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      Gpeterson
      How do you can your meat. I have never canned meat.
      Betty

      • October 26, 2013 at 11:36 pm
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        Betty, Here is a link for canning venison. It is exactly the same method as I use for any other meat. http://www.simplycanning.com/canning-venison.html
        I recently got chicken leg quarters for 69 cents a pound and canned the chicken and broth. (Although–with the chicken, I cook it down first and then take the meat off the bones. I also do add the broth to the cans of chicken)

  • October 25, 2013 at 8:28 am
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    Don’t forget to throw your cooked-down veggie scraps to the chickens. They love ’em!

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