Are you still buying those individual packets of chili seasoning?  Or do you know how long that bottle of chili powder has been sitting in your spice cabinet?  Don’t worry – we used to buy those packets and to be quite honest, I am sure that bottle of chili powder has been in our pantry for at least 2 years. Scary when you think about it….

Chili made with homemade chili powder and chili seasoning.
Chili made with homemade chili powder and chili seasoning.
Chili powder made in minutes from dried peppers from the garden.
Chili powder made in minutes from dried peppers from the garden.

We all know that you can’t beat the use of fresh ingredients in anything you cook.  But not many people think of making their own chili seasonings.  Fall is the perfect time to gather those last few peppers in your garden and make a spice that you can use throughout the fall and winter.  It is actually quite easy and takes less than 15 minutes.  You can even personalize it and make a couple of versions to adjust the heat level based on your target audience.

For this year’s chili cook off out at the farm, we have made our own chili powder and homemade chili seasoning that is way better than any store-bought version, and of course, much healthier.  After tasting it in a fresh batch of chili, it is guaranteed to be a crowd favorite!

*As always, use caution when handling peppers – wear gloves and process in a well ventilated area.

Chili Powder Recipe

Dried cayenne peppers add a nice kick to chili powder
Dried cayenne peppers add a nice kick to chili powder

Ingredients:
 9-12 dried peppers – stemmed and seeded

*This is where strict following recipe lovers get frustrated.  I don’t put specific peppers here because it will depend on what you have available in your geographical area.  Most standard recipes call for 3 ancho peppers (dried poblano peppers), 3 cascabel chiles – also known as the little bell, and 3 arbol chiles (or substitute cayenne peppers).  

We  use whatever we have in our garden that year but you can also buy a variety of dried chile peppers at a local or international market.  The key is to have a variety of peppers that produce a variety of flavors and heat. 

       Our mixture this year consists of these peppers from our garden that we dried:

3 hot banana peppers
3 mini belle peppers
2 super cayenne peppers
3 chinese lantern peppers
1 chipotle pepper

 

2 tablespoons of whole cumin seeds
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon oregano
1 teaspoon smoked paprika

Instructions:

1. Remove the stems of the peppers and most of the seeds.

Toast cumin seeds with the dried peppers for approximately 4-5 minutes.
Toast cumin seeds with the dried peppers for approximately 4-5 minutes.

2. Place all of the peppers and the cumin into a medium nonstick pan and place over medium-high heat. Cook, moving the pan around constantly, until you begin to smell the cumin toasting, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. Set aside and cool completely.

3. Once cool, place the peppers and cumin into a small food processor or blender. Add the garlic powder, oregano, and paprika. Process until a fine powder is formed.

*Allow the powder to settle for at least a minute before removing your lid.

Store in an airtight container for up to 6 months. – makes approximately 3/4 cup.

Chili Seasoning Mix

Ingredients:

Add chili seasoning ingredients into a bowl and mix with a fork.
Add chili seasoning ingredients into a bowl and mix with a fork.

*Equals one packet of chili seasoning

1 tbsp flour
2 tbsp onion powder
1 1/2 tsp chili powder (recipe above)
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp crushed red pepper
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp ground cumin

Instructions:

1. Place all ingredients in a bowl and mix with a fork

2. Store in an air tight container for up to 6 months. (yes, it’s that easy!)

Enjoy!

**If you would like to receive our Recipe Of The Week each Friday – be sure to sign up to follow the blog via email in the right had column, “like” us on  the Facebook, or follow us on Twitter.

Mary and Jim




Chili Powder and Chili Seasoning Mix
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Chili Powder Ingredients
  1. 9-12 dried peppers - stemmed and seeded
  2. 2 tablespoons of whole cumin seeds
  3. 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  4. 1 tablespoon oregano
  5. 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
Chili Seasoning Mix Ingredients
  1. *Equals one packet of chili seasoning
  2. 1 tbsp flour
  3. 2 tbsp onion powder
  4. 1 1/2 tsp chili powder (recipe above)
  5. 1 tsp salt
  6. 1/2 tsp crushed red pepper
  7. 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  8. 1/2 tsp ground cumin
Instructions
  1. Remove the stems of the peppers and most of the seeds.
  2. Place all of the peppers and the cumin into a medium nonstick pan and place over medium-high heat. Cook, moving the pan around constantly, until you begin to smell the cumin toasting, approximately 4 to 5 minutes. Set aside and cool completely.
  3. Once cool, place the peppers and cumin into a small food processor or blender. Add the garlic powder, oregano, and paprika. Process until a fine powder is formed. Allow the powder to settle for at least a minute before removing your lid.
  4. Store in an airtight container for up to 6 months. - makes approximately 3/4 cup.
For the Chili Powder
  1. Place all ingredients in a bowl and mix with a fork
  2. Store in an air tight container for up to 6 months. (yes, it's that easy!)
Notes
  1. This is where strict following recipe lovers get frustrated. I don't put specific peppers here because it will depend on what you have available in your geographical area. Most standard recipes call for 3 ancho peppers (dried poblano peppers), 3 cascabel chiles - also known as the little bell, and 3 arbol chiles (or substitute cayenne peppers).
  2. We use whatever we have in our garden that year but you can also buy a variety of dried chile peppers at a local or international market. The key is to have a variety of peppers that produce a variety of flavors and heat.
  3. Recipe courtesy of Old World Garden Farms
Old World Garden Farms http://oldworldgardenfarms.com/

15 thoughts on “Chili Powder and Chili Seasoning Recipe – Make Your Own In Minutes

  • October 16, 2016 at 4:29 pm
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    Great recipes! I so much enjoy your site and news letters since I first discovered you. I have a question about the chilies you included above. You mentioned that you used a Chipotle chili which is usually considered to be a smoked, dried jalapeno pepper. Is that what you were referring to and if so, do you smoke dry your own?

  • January 29, 2015 at 12:32 pm
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    Have you tried using dried jalapenos? I have some I dried this year but I’m not sure they will offer the flavor or heat I’d like.

    • January 29, 2015 at 12:35 pm
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      I also plan to add to our pepper repertoire this year. I want to make my own smoked paprika.

  • October 4, 2014 at 4:09 pm
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    JiM/Mary I love your website. I ran across it a year or two ago and I love it. Thanks so much for sharing all that you do on your farm. I have a small garden and I enjoy growing my own vegetables. After seeing all of Mary’s canning I told my husband I will have to start doing the same thing. I remember my mom doing a lot of canning when we were growing up, so now I guess it’s time to follow in her footsteps. Thanks again for sharing all that you do. By the way I live in Columbia, SC.

    Josephine

  • August 4, 2014 at 12:54 pm
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    Last summer I cut a bunch of jalepenos, tied them together, and hung them upside down in the garage. It’s a year later and they are still there. Am should I throw them away?

    • August 4, 2014 at 2:43 pm
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      If there is no mold and they are simply dried – they should be more than fine

  • October 18, 2013 at 5:42 pm
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    I can testify from personal experience, you HAVE to let the dust settle in that processor BEFORE you ever open the lid. The first time I did peppers, I popped that lid open and holy moly, thought I was going to die!!!

    • October 20, 2013 at 7:55 pm
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      We did the same thing – now we process most of our dried peppers in the open garage!

  • October 18, 2013 at 1:25 pm
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    Sounds great! Not familiar with Chinese Lantern peppers, where do you obtain seeds, and how do they rate compared with other peppers on the heat scale??

    • October 20, 2013 at 7:59 pm
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      We actually got our seeds when we were on a visit to Florida. The peppers range from 5,000-30,000 scoville units….and I swear all of ours are around the 30,000 range! Very tasty though, and the heat doesn’t last long.

  • October 18, 2013 at 11:37 am
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    We love this website and use it weekly! Thank you! Suz and Larry

  • October 18, 2013 at 9:04 am
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    Sounds good. We just de-stem all our 10-20 varieties of hot peppers, place them in our large smoker and smoke dry them with apple wood. Once dry we grind them with our Vitamix. This is all done outside because even my neighbors know when we are grinding these babies! Now that I have a recipe for a chili mix I will have to give yours a try. Thanks

    • November 6, 2013 at 1:16 pm
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      Thank you for the vitamix tip. I have one also

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